Hot answers tagged

34

Products high in calcium and magnesium should not be taken at the same time as antibiotics of the tetracycline (tetracycline, doxicycline, etc.) class, and milk should also be avoided with the quinolone class. They have the ability to bind the antibiotic in the gut, decreasing absorption. There is no reason to avoid dairy products while taking other ...


9

In short: According to several recent systematic reviews of studies, milk consumption is not associated with significant side effects, increased mortality, cancer, osteoporosis, heart disease or stroke. Milk and dairy products: good or bad for human health? An assessment of the totality of scientific evidence (PubMed, 2016) very few adverse effects have ...


6

There are several risks related to excessive consumption of milk. A 12 years prospective study run on around 78000 women showed that high consumption of milk (2-3 glasses per day) increased the risk of fracture when compared to people who used to drink one glass or less per week. (1) Similar results were found in other studies like, for example: 2. The ...


6

Pasteurized milk is perfectly safe for people of all ages but raw milk may or may not be. According to the CDC: Raw milk is milk from any animal that has not been pasteurized to kill harmful bacteria. Raw milk can carry harmful bacteria and other germs that can make you very sick or kill you. While it is possible to get foodborne illnesses from many ...


5

If the main thrust of the question is indeed expressed in the title and tags of the question: Q “There is a very strong correlation between consuming dairy products — such as milk — and acne, skin breakouts and aging.” Then the jury on that really isn't finished deciding: Is acne related to the ingestion of dairy products? It is not a new idea. It ...


5

These are biologically plausible effects supported by moderate quality observational evidence. As a personal aside, I do not believe there is enough evidence for harm to recommend eliminating dairy products from a healthy person's diet. A full discussion of all the evidence for the impact of dairy in diet is beyond the scope of this answer, though, so lets ...


5

There are several issues regarding dairy that have to be taken into consideration. One is the link between casein and cancers. I have heard a presentation from the author of some of the prominent studies on the subject, and have reduced my own family's intake of dairy based on findings. An example of another author's findings is this paper, which ...


5

This is most commonly a precaution to prevent Mal-absorption. Milk has copious amounts of calcium which bond with the antibiotic in the gut. Once the tetracycline (antibiotic) bonds, it creates a neutral environment for food to digest in. Once the calcium bonds with mil it breaks down the antibiotic as well as the stomach acid used to break it down.This will ...


4

Humans are strange among mammals in making dairy products such a large proportion of their adult diet. It reminds me of this amusing quote by Henry David Thoreau: One farmer says to me, 'You cannot live on vegetable food solely, for it furnishes nothing to make bones with;' and so he religiously devotes a part of his day to supplying his system with ...


3

In short: Cooking milk has probably only a minor effect on its nutritional value. MICRONUTRIENTS: According to USDA Table of Nutrient Retention Factors (p. 5), in milk heated for 10 minutes, the vitamin loses are: vitamin B1, B6 and choline: 10% ; vitamin C and folate: 15% ; vitamin B12: 20%. Other vitamins and minerals are not affected. From the ...


3

I have found no credible source that would mention "maximum recommended daily amount of full fat milk." MedlinePlus: The US Department of Agriculture recommends the following daily amounts of dairy for children and teens: Two through 3 years old: 2 cups (480 milliliters) Four through 8 years old: 2½ cups (600 milliliters) Nine through 18 ...


3

No, that is incorrect. Liters are a measure of volume but grams are a measure of weight, so you need to convert 1 liter of milk to the weight of 1 liter of milk. (Your calculations would be correct for water, by the way.) Milk is an organic product so some variation is going to exist, but 1 liter of whole milk weighs approximately 1031 grams. From that ...


3

As you imply in your question, enzymes are catalysts, and as such, participate in a chemical reaction but remain unchanged after that reaction is completed. Therefore, once lactase has converted a lactose molecule into galactose and glucose, it is free to split another. According to this website, lactase can split up to sixty lactose molecules each second, ...


3

According to this review article, adults need a bit more than 1 gram of calcium per day. However, it may be the case that the natural vitamin D levels for the human body should be a lot higher than what is currently the norm, see e.g. here. Calcium is absorbed from the gut by both passive and active mechanisms, the active mechanism is vitamin D dependent. If ...


3

You certainly don't require milk in your diet. Those with allergies need to avoid it. The whole thing is about getting the nutrients that the body needs. If you replace them with sufficient alternative sources, you'll be fine. Don't forget the calcium, the added vitamin D, etc. that's in milk: All very important building blocks for a healthy life. ...


3

WebMD Signs and Symptoms of Vitamin D deficiency can be subtle, but can manifest as bone pain and muscle weakness. Also, excessive sweating(when not indicated due to exercise level and heat). Because of the sometimes subtle symptoms, getting appropiate screening based on risk factors and regular physician exams is important to discovering and managing ...


2

You can find directions for pasteurizing goat milk many places online, and that should render it safe from pathogens. However, it will do nothing to protect you from heavy metals, pesticides, and other toxins that goat might be ingesting. Considering that it's eating from garbage piles, I would consider it very likely the milk contains at least some toxins. ...


2

The following is for adults: Relationship between milk intake and mucus production in adult volunteers challenged with rhinovirus-2. (PubMed): In individuals inoculated with the common cold virus, milk intake was not associated with increased nasal secretions, symptoms of cough, nose symptoms or congestion.


1

It's not a good argument which doesn't meant hat there aren't better arguments in favor of it. The problem with "we're the only animals that do X" arguments, is that you can substitute for X a lot of other things besides drinking milk and then it becomes problematic in an obvious way. E.g. we're the only animals that walk upright, we're the only animals that ...


1

The only well studied effects of drinking tea are the Green Tea Catechins: I would highly recommend people pay attention to the bioavailability issue and pay attention to Quercetin. Green tea seems Godly in vitro, but it has high variability in people because not 100% of the catechins get to the cell to exert effects. Any supplementation with ...


1

Milk contains two substances that are known to be related to sleep and relaxation: the hormone melatonin and the amino acid tryptophan. The amount of melatonin in a glass of milk is minute, much less than what would be taken in a supplement. Although, according to scientific analysis, combining milk with a carbohydrate-rich food like oatmeal, granola, or ...


1

The label is incomplete in a way. It's a rule by the FDA. NIH: the FDA does not require food labels to list magnesium content unless a food has been fortified with this nutrient. So unless it's fortified you probs won't see it as the labels are filled with other things like Vitamin D, Calcium. And milk labels are quite small. Milk is a good source of ...


1

Vitamin D deficiency can actually cause or exacerbate depression, and it can manifest itself in feelings of tiredness, persistent sadness, weakness, etc... It also prevents your bones from mineralizing so your bone density may decline and cause bone pain (as stated by WebMD). I've experienced this, and it feels like an ache deep inside your limbs. I also had ...


1

In Dietary Reference Intakes by Institute of Medicine (US) Panel on Micronutrients we can read that RDA for adult men and women is 45 μg/day. The average dietary intake of molybdenum by adult men and women is 109 and 76 μg/day, respectively. Biego and his coworkers1 in 1998 reported an average molybdenum concentration of 4 μg/L in human milk with stage of ...


1

Diet.com suggests that molybdenum sources in food are between 57% and 88% efficient in absorption rates nutritionally, and additionally lists milk content as 4.9 μg per cup, which is much lower than the suggestions elsewhere. This may be a good lower bound for calculation. However, remember that the tolerable upper limit for adults is considered to be 0.6 mg ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible