7

You're describing an unexpected intra-operative finding. The possibility of unexpected findings (and their treatment) is usually discussed during the consent for the original procedure. Of course, in this situation, there was no initial discussion. The way this sort of issue is usually framed in medical ethics uses a framework of four principles (see ...


3

People are more complicated than machines. First, imagine a condition like "high blood pressure" or "underactive thyroid." It's not just a case of measuring one number about you and comparing it to one "correct" number. There is a normal range for healthy people. Imagine some measurement that for normal people is between 10 and 12. Imagine that you genuinely ...


3

Does this mean my previous psychiatrist can share information with my current psychiatrist? Yes.1,2 There is an exception for 'psychotherapy notes', a term with a very specific meaning3 under HIPAA: Psychotherapy notes means notes recorded (in any medium) by a health care provider who is a mental health professional documenting or analyzing the ...


2

At least for psychological study, it seem ethical to deliberately lying to the subjects, as long as the research is review through a committee about ethical issues. Source In medical study, I think instead of saying affirmatively "we guarantee that there will be no side effect", they can say "this is a new drug so we don't know much about its side effect, ...


2

There are 2 questions here: Is not disclosing potential side effects during a clinical trial ethical? What does the "informed consent" of a clinical trial say about disclosing side effects? According to Understanding Informed Consent by CenterWatch: If you have given consent to participate in a clinical trial...you are entitled to the following ...


2

Protecting the majority with the minority (old people, people with bad immune systems, etc) doesn't seem to be an ethical thing to do. (Think of this case. It's kind of like putting the pain of everybody onto a single innocent person. ) Essentially the idea was to do the reverse i.e. if the majority get infected -> gain immunity then if you can keep the (...


2

Writing a script for someone so you can "get physical" with them is, of course, an ethical problem. As far as prescribing off the cuff for family and close friends, that depends. It may be quite common. Over 80% of internal medicine and family practice residents prescribed for "non-patients" in this survey. The wording in itself is troubling. If you write a ...


2

A lot of hospitals are not currently performing elective surgeries because: Operating rooms and PACUs (post-anesthesia care units) have been converted to take care of patients with COVID Staffing shortages due to reassignments to COVID-related units Shortages of PPE (e.g. gowns) that are needed to perform surgery Unnecessary risk of coronavirus transmission ...


1

There is most probably no hard rule that will fit (almost) every hospital, because it depends on a variety of factors. Central hospitals with a lot types of surgery will have a bigger pressure to work on elective surgery. Also, the categories elective versus non-elective can be misleading: On a very strict level elective surgery would include every type of ...


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