6

This page from the NIH has a lot of relevant information about lactose intolerance. There are several standard diagnostic tests for lactose intolerance, but your physician might ask you to try eliminating dairy from your diet before you receive any of those tests. If avoiding lactose alleviates your symptoms, you've potentially treated your primary lactose ...


6

First, here is a small background on lactose intolerance: Lactose is a disaccharide present in high quantity in mammalian milk. Once in the intestine, it is hydrolysed into glucose and galactose, which are then absorbed. Lactase hydrolisation is dependent on an intestinal brush border enzyme called lactase. Intestinal lactase activity is highest during the ...


4

First, let me highly commend your wife. The WHO recommendation for breastfeeding up to 2yr is not for show. It really can help prevent a whole slew of problems. Unfortunately, no there are no ways to maintain lactase production in a prolonged lactose free diet. She may get extremely luckily and maintain the bacteria that are needed on her own, but she ...


3

As you imply in your question, enzymes are catalysts, and as such, participate in a chemical reaction but remain unchanged after that reaction is completed. Therefore, once lactase has converted a lactose molecule into galactose and glucose, it is free to split another. According to this website, lactase can split up to sixty lactose molecules each second, ...


3

Very generally speaking I would say it depends on the cause of the intolerance - if it is a primary intolerance (i. e. genetic problem with lactase persistence deficiency, the enzyme for digesting lactose) no additional exposure will cause a change in genetics. Another genetic form of lactose intolerance prevents forming of lactase enzymes. Secondary ...


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