6

If the weapon is still in the wound : don't touch anything and call the appropriate emergency system (varies from country to country). Never attempt to remove any penetrating object still in situ as this may cause more serious bleeding If the wound is open, apply little pressure on it with clean clothes. And call the appropriate emergency system, keep ...


3

A triangular wound can possibly be sutured, depending on many considerations regarding the wound including its type, condition, location, size, shape, depth, cleanliness vs presence of debris, mechanism of injury, the force of the injury, the age of the wound, tension on the wound, the patient’s medical history, species if the wound is a bite, etc... In “...


3

Triangular blades were created for pretty much one reason, and one reason only. The triangular cross section made a stronger blade, ensuring more damage was done in a charge/stab versus a flat blade. The triangular blade was introduced in the early 1700's, mostly due to strength reasons. A triangular blade is less likely to bend/break when stabbing in a ...


3

The key, I think, is the relationship between energy transferred and the ability of the receiving tissue to tolerate it. For example, although the overall kinetic energy of a knife is relatively low the tip/blade pressure is extremely high, more than high enough to part tissues and, critically, cut through arterial walls causing fatal bleeding. Drowning is ...


2

I had an uncle that could do this trick, and it always amazed me. Perhaps it's obvious, but I should mention that they always use a sword with a dull blade.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible