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The diet consists of 24 oranges per day plus water. Nothing else. So let's see how much nutrition you're actually getting per day. Percentages are based on US Recommended Daily Intake for an adult. Calories: 1128 kcal (56%) Sugar: 224 grams Fiber: 58 grams (232%) Fat: 2.9 grams (4%) Protein: 22 grams (44%) Vitamins Vitamin A: 24% Thiamine: 192% Riboflavin ...


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Question: How much vitamin C is actually present in a glass of orange juice, taking into account could have been passed months since harvesting-squeezing-bottling to drinking? The nutrition label of the bottled juice should tell what is in the bottled juice after harvesting-squeezing-bottling. USDA.gov has evaluated the amount of vitamin C in many brands of ...


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There is no correlation between something tasting "bad" and being good for you. Many things that taste bad are in fact bad for you, and many things that you think taste bad, other people like the taste of. When you juice a vegetable or a fruit, the taste is generally stronger in the juice than if you were just to eat it raw. If it's a cherry or an orange, ...


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The problem with getting your daily requirement of water solely from juices, is that most juices have significant amounts of sugar in them. Let's say your favorite juice is orange juice. Orange juice is about 88.3% water so in order to get your recommended 64 fl. oz. (1.892 L) of water you'd have to consume 72 fl. oz. (2.129 L) of juice. Orange juice has 112 ...


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That is true, in principle. A bit slower is usually at least a bit better. The same principle that differentiates olive oil grades can be applied to juices. A proper (albeit quite small) study on this seems to confirm this. Quality Changes of Fresh Vegetable and Fruit Juice by Various Juicers KSBB Journal, Volume 29, Issue 3, 2014, pp.145-154, Korean ...


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