6

First, notice that bubbles are stopped by the drip chamber on the IV, or if there's an infusion pump instead of a drip chamber, the pump itself will detect it and stop the flow. If there is a small bubble or two in the line after the drip chamber or pump, notice that it doesn't go anywhere. It just sits there and doesn't move with the fluid so it never ...


2

A vein that has undergone venipuncture woud be more dificult to extract blood because it is already traumatized/injured. Some veins would be thicker when healed and some would be friable. That's why they alternate arms for phlebotomy to allow your veins to heal. Experience wise, there's nothing much we can do about it. But i find it easier to extract blood ...


2

You've already hit all the main points so there's not much to add. I'm sorry to say that some people are simply a "tough stick" and there's not much you can do about it. For example, I have a friend who looks like he should be an easy stick. He's athletic, muscular, with very little body fat, and those types usually have pipelines for veins that you can hit ...


2

Though difficult and time consuming, the body will instinctively contract and give birth to the baby. In the case of a strong epidural anesthetic, the woman is unable to push, but the contractions will continue. In some cases, the mother would even pass out during labor and still be able to give vaginal birth. A woman will still be able to eventually give ...


1

I do know that something can be injected into a patient's IV to wake them up immediately from general anaesthesia. That's not how it works. Many anaesthetics only work for minutes at best. A normal dosage of propofol would have to be renewed every 5-10 minutes. To "wake" you from general anaesthesia, they just stop administering anaesthetic agents....


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