6

It is very unlikely that the skin would rupture due to internal bleeding. Adults have about 5.5 liters of blood inside the circulatory system (arteries/veins/heart/pulmonary circulation) or "intravascular space." When about 40% of blood is lost from the intravascular space (so about 2 liters), the circulatory system collapses, and you die. Clinical Review: ...


6

First off, she would be killed instantly. There wouldn't be any question of what might kill her "ultimately" because ultimately would be the moment she hit the ground. Yes, there have been people who survived falls from much greater heights, with the record holder being Vesna Vulović, a Serbian flight attendant who fell 10,160 m (33,330 ft), but those are ...


5

After internal bleeding, the blood serum from the blood can be reabsorbed back into the circulation (capillaries), and the blood cells can be phagocytosed by macrophages. The blood serum from the abdominal cavity can be resorbed by the peritoneal blood vessels and from the pleural space by the pleural lymphatic vessels. Some hematomas may not be ...


3

I agree with @Carey Gregory's answer. I can tell you how a man falling only 30 feet landing on his back on concrete died. A 30 year old male working on the underside (?) of a bridge, unsecured, fell as above. There were no obvious external injuries. The skull was intact, etc. He arrived by ambulance unconscious and without a pulse. Advanced Trauma Life ...


3

Yes, it is possible that one gradually develops chronic pancreatitis after a single attack of acute pancreatitis. Pancreatitis (NIDDK) The chronic form of pancreatitis can be triggered by one acute attack that damages the pancreatic duct. The damaged duct causes the pancreas to become inflamed. Scar tissue develops and the pancreas is slowly ...


1

That depends on the age and general condition of the patient, as well as why and how fast and where they're losing blood. In your case, if you had pancreatitis severe enough to perforate the splenic artery (or another of the many large vessels touching the pancreas), the answer is "not much, cause you're already in bad shape". Then again, if that were the ...


1

The "sulfur" based powder you are referring to is sulfonamide which was an antimicrobial, not a clotting agent. It's not sulfur based, but is often called "sulfa", which is where you may be thinking it's sulfur. It's a white powder that medics used on open wounds, for the antimicrobrial properties. Pretty much every US soldier had sulfa packs and were ...


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