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Basically, the immune system does function in the respiratory epithelium contra to your theory, and the usual cascade of innate mechanisms triggering the adaptive ones also works in the epithelium: Several immune cell populations are resident in epithelium including CD103+ CD8+ T cells and CD103+ conventional dendritic cell populations which act as sentinel ...


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The argument is not logical because it assumes that there is some novelty to the body being presented with a pathogen, thus administering dozens of vaccines creates some numeric risk. In fact, organisms are assaulted by large numbers of pathogens constantly. Each of these pathogens can have multiple features, called antigens, that trigger the immune system. ...


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Don't all coronaviruses share this same spike protein? No they don't, although the spikes do share a "shaft" fragment "S2" that is recognized by some anti-bodies across several coronavirues. This cross-reactivity was even in blood samples collected as far back as 2011, but it was at low levels. Two preliminary retrospective studies in ...


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An article on Medium had a Q&A with various medical and public policy experts about the vaccine and its rollout. One of the questions was exactly what you asked. The answer is basically "probably not but it might help against SARS and the research could lead to multi-coronavirus vaccines later." Here is the main part of the response: “We do ...


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