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9 votes

Is a hyperventilation+hypoventilation breathing exercise (Wim Hof Method) more likely to prevent or promote cancer?

Hyperventilation can lead to reduced oxygen transport to cells. As a result, ineffective breathing patterns can cause cell and tissue hypoxia, chronic inflammation, immunosuppression, and many other ...
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6 votes
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Is a hyperventilation+hypoventilation breathing exercise (Wim Hof Method) more likely to prevent or promote cancer?

Apart from monks and nuns who showcase impressive abilities Wim Hof is onto something. One anecdote reads as follows: I’ve also experienced the positive changes myself, […] My cardiovascular and ...
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5 votes

What oxygen saturation level causes fainting?

I think it's hard to say because there seems to be substantial variability. The lowest figure I've heard was 30%, but it's from an anonymous report quoted in The Guardian: An anaesthetist at a London ...
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5 votes

Can voluntarily hyperventilating cause cerebral hypoxia, and therefore brain cell death (brain damage)?

Essentially, yes you could hyperventilate to cause a subtle cerebral hypoxia (as also happens briefly during a faint), but once unconscious you would return to automatic breathing and the effects of ...
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4 votes
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Simulate hypoxic training by breath holding/regulation

The approach you describe most likely will not work, and could be detrimental to your training. The main benefit of training at altitude is that the body will adapt to the lower concentration of ...
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1 vote

Simulate hypoxic training by breath holding/regulation

Since there is a good answer already I'll just add my two cents from my understanding of physiology: Hypoventilation has two effects during exercise: Less available oxygen in your lungs and a ...
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