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9

Hyperventilation can lead to reduced oxygen transport to cells. As a result, ineffective breathing patterns can cause cell and tissue hypoxia, chronic inflammation, immunosuppression, and many other negative effects caused by low body-oxygen levels and hypocapnia (reduced CO2 levels). Hypoxia has been found to be a driving force in several health ...


6

Apart from monks and nuns who showcase impressive abilities Wim Hof is onto something. One anecdote reads as follows: I’ve also experienced the positive changes myself, […] My cardiovascular and muscular endurance has increased substantially too, with a reduction in my run times, thanks to the over-saturation of oxygen to my cells, activation of my ...


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Essentially, yes you could hyperventilate to cause a subtle cerebral hypoxia (as also happens briefly during a faint), but once unconscious you would return to automatic breathing and the effects of the hyperventilation would reverse. There is some interesting information in this article. Although it relates to hyperventilation as relevant to anaesthetics (...


4

The approach you describe most likely will not work, and could be detrimental to your training. The main benefit of training at altitude is that the body will adapt to the lower concentration of oxygen by stimulating the production of erythropoietin which in turn causes the body to produce more red blood cells. What you are describing is a very limited ...


1

Since there is a good answer already I'll just add my two cents from my understanding of physiology: Hypoventilation has two effects during exercise: Less available oxygen in your lungs and a somewhat less amount of oxygen in the blood that comes out of your lungs, which is not as big a difference as you might expect because hemoglobin is incredibly ...


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