5

Essentially, yes you could hyperventilate to cause a subtle cerebral hypoxia (as also happens briefly during a faint), but once unconscious you would return to automatic breathing and the effects of the hyperventilation would reverse. There is some interesting information in this article. Although it relates to hyperventilation as relevant to anaesthetics (...


3

I am unaware of any mechanism by which exercise can cause "blood alkalization" (usually called "alkalosis"). Blood pH is VERY tightly regulated at 7.35-7.45 (slightly alkaline), so it rarely changes much except in severe illness. That said, slight acidosis can occur in exercise due to an increase in carbon dioxide released from muscles (...


3

If your friend has had similar attacks in the past and he has been told by a general practitioner or a psychyatrist that those were panic attacks, just help him calm down and tell him that the feeling of impending doom, the sweats, dizziness, palpĂ­tations and difficult breathing are all part of the clinical picture of a panic attack. Convince him that if he ...


2

Breathing into a paper bag to control hyperventilation might improve hypocarbia, but should NOT be done because of the risks of hypoxia and death. This case report shows that breathing into a paper bag during hyperventilation can reduce partial pressure of oxygen by up to 42 mmHg (normal 80-100mmHg) and can result in death. As answered by @arkiaamu, a better ...


2

I did not find any studies which would investigate that matter. Moreover, in 2008 Nillni and co-workers (1) stated: Surprisingly, although the expressed goal of breathing training is to correct hyperventilation, pCO2 has never been used as an outcome measure In a recent study (2) it was concluded: Clinical improvement must have depended on elements ...


1

The two proposed mechanisms for paresthesia/tetany secondary to hyperventilation are cerebral vasoconstriction and electrolyte imbalance. Cerebral vasoconstriction: Cerebral blood flow decreases in a linear relationship to decreased PaCO2 (partial pressure of carbon dioxide). Thus, hyperventilation -> decreased PaCO2 -> decreased cerebral blood flow -&...


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