5

The above answer is correct: no they can't function independently. I want to build on that answer with a couple additional points. Consider that your heart beats while you hold your breath - but it needs oxygen, so if your lungs stop for a long time they aren't exchanging O2 and CO2 so your heart muscle will eventually stop. Conversely if your heart stops,...


5

You're overlooking one important point: Both the heart and lungs are living tissue too, and without both circulating blood and oxygen they will die just like all the other tissues in the body. So no, neither one can continue to function without the other. As for CPR, I don't see how anything would change. Without circulating blood in the lungs, no gas ...


3

There's a free selection here. It covers: The normal heart Interventricular septal defect Interatrial septal defect Pulmonary stenosis Patent ductus arteriosus Mitral stenosis Mitral insufficiency Aortic stenosis Aortic insufficiency Hypertension within the systemic circulation Hypertension within the pulmonary circulation Gallop rhythm Sclerosis of the ...


2

Probably the doctor isn't using the stethoscope to determine your heart beat rate. Mine seem to use it to listen to my lungs as I breathe, and I've seen them used to listen for valve sounds or other oddnesses in a baby's heartbeat. The actual rate can be determined other ways: the stethoscope is more for observing the sounds in your chest. They may move on ...


2

Yes. Most inflammatory processes (including viral infections) can cause elevation of heart rate via cytokines and activation of the sympathetic nervous system. (That's an oversimplification of a complex process.) Temperature regulation involves the hypothalamus as well, and fever (which is mediated by some of the same cytokine mechanisms) is often ...


1

Unlike atrioventricular valves, semilunar valves' leaflets are concave, somewhat like shallow bags, which, during the diastole are filled with blood and therefore are pushed back to touch one another and so close the valve opening. Here's a good gif to visualise. Some reference: 4 Valves of the Heart: What Are They & How They Work


1

I highly recommend seeing a doctor, although to put your mind at ease, I can tell you both from research and heavy personal experience that palpitations can also be caused by many things including stress, anxiety, depression, sleep deprivation, dehydration (possibly chronic), poor nutrition, caffeine, nicotine, alcohol, other drug side effects, etc. While ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible