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CRP C-reactive protein (CRP) is produced by the liver. The level of CRP rises when there is inflammation throughout the body. It is one of a group of proteins called "acute phase reactants" that go up in response to inflammation. So, when there is an inflammation anywhere in your body, the amount of C-reactive protein in your blood will rise. The CRP ...


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Increased levels of stomach acid aren't actually listed as causes for GERD anywhere I could find. It is listed as a cause for ulcers, but not GERD: Increased levels of gastrin can cause increased release of acid and may lead to ulcers (Zollinger-Ellison syndrome) [Stomach acid test - What Abnormal Results Mean] Gastroesophageal reflux disease occurs when ...


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It sounds like you know that some lifestyle modifications have been shown to be beneficial with patients who have mild to moderate GERD and that these interventions are typically preferable to pharmacological intervention. Right on! The definitive information on management of GERD can be found on the website of the American College of Gastroenterology. ...


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This advice for drinking vinegar for acid reflux/GERD is not something I've been able to find any credible backing for. The OP's source for the claim being draxe.com suggests they are talking about this page which, as the OP has correctly determined, is full of contradictory and confusing advice. Along what appears to be a pretty poor grasp of how ...


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In summary: The first line of treatment of GERD symptoms are lifestyle changes: losing weight (if necessary), avoiding triggering foods and moderate physical activity. Eliminating all suspected foods until symptoms improve and then introducing them back one by one is a reasonable method. Even if you can control symptoms of GERD by lifestyle changes, GERD ...


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Effective lifestyle modifications would include: Weight loss - excess weight causes pressure on the stomach, overcoming the lower-oesophageal sphincter and pushing acid into the oesophagus Abstinence from Alcohol - alcohol irritates the gastric lining causing pain. Stopping smoking - nicotine activates receptors in the stomach wall, encouraging the ...


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Advice against lying down after a meal is usually given to those who already have acid reflux (WebMD) and not to everyone. Reflux comes from excessive relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) or diaphragmatic sphincter (the later occurs in hiatal hernia), which results in a free flow of acid into the esophagus when you lie down. If your LES ...


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You can neutralize bile by bile acid sequestrants, such as cholestyramine or colestipol. However, these and other medications, such as H2 blockers and metoclopramide, may not be very effective (Drugs.com, UpToDate, PubMed). The following may prevent bile reflux symptoms: Lifestyle modifications: avoiding large meals, lying down after meals, eating before ...


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Only your healthcare provider can help diagnose and treat YOUR situation, so keep working with them on this. But what I can do is help reflect your own statements back to you. Regarding the recommendations that your doctor gave you: (1) You say you're not responding to weight loss - but that you are still 40 lbs overweight. You have reduced your ...


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It's neither. Acid reflux, according to Wikipedia, is caused by: ... poor closure of the lower esophageal sphincter ... (second paragraph) This in turn causes stomach acid to rise into the esophagus, which is regardless of the levels of acid present in the stomach. The WP reference given is NIDKK, who say that a weak sphincter is caused by: ...


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The average person has never felt chest pain of cardiac origin so has no idea what it "should" feel like, and therefore they have no way of knowing how to distinguish it from other sources of chest pain. Yes, reflux causes actual chest pain in some people. Just because you can easily recognize it as reflux doesn't mean everyone can. What if you've felt ...


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Firstly, I would be reluctant to ascribe those symptoms (recurrent oral canker sores) to acid reflux. In very severe reflux acid can make its way up the oesophagus and can cause chemical burns to the throat and mouth, but there would also be other related symptoms, like nausea, indigestion, heartburn, persistent coughing (caused by acid irritating the larynx)...


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I would first and foremost attempt to lose weight; nevertheless, Endoscopy is not really the the optimal test to diagnose hiatal hernia. You should do a double-contrast Esophagus-Stomach-Duodenal X-Ray. As for what Gene said re: PPIs, it makes no sense. Their mechanism of action is to inhibit the chemical mechanism that allows the gastric parietal cells to ...


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