5

Your stomach may contain bacteria that are harmless as long as they are in your digestive tract, but are potentially lethal if they get into other organs. A ruptured ulcer means that it's possible for the stomach contents to leak into the abdominal cavity and possibly the bloodstream. If the bacteria get established in you blood they will be carried to all ...


4

First of all, if you found papers that suggest certain unexplored side effects, it means the research is underway and it can very well be that in the next years we get new information about how drugs work. Now to the actual question. From the pharmacokinetic point of view, PPIs only affect proton pumps of the stomach. The solution behind this is very simple: ...


4

"Proton pump" is a broad category of proteins rather than a specific pump. The drugs called "proton pump inhibitors (PPIs)" to reduce stomach acid target a specific proton pump, the hydrogen/potassium ATPase. Of course, it is possible for drugs to have off-target effects at other proteins, especially similar ones. It is also possible for ...


3

Very generally speaking I would say it depends on the cause of the intolerance - if it is a primary intolerance (i. e. genetic problem with lactase persistence deficiency, the enzyme for digesting lactose) no additional exposure will cause a change in genetics. Another genetic form of lactose intolerance prevents forming of lactase enzymes. Secondary ...


2

Basically, theobromine and theophylline (see e. g. https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/Theobromine), which is similar to caffeine. There are even some people doing coffee enemas (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coffee_enema), although the effect in those is probably less laxative than poisonous. For the laxative effect of theobromine see e. g. https://...


2

Supplementation of vitamins and minerals in the context of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) should be specific to existing deficiencies in each patient (1). There is little evidence in this context for blind ingestion of over the counter supplements without a diagnostic correlate for, or at least reasonable clinical suspicion of a particular deficiency. Do ...


1

Are there other ways of supplementing? Are there supplements that are not contraindicated? Yes. There are ways to deliver vitamins directly to the cell without needing to be passed by the intestinal system. E.g. Vitamin B12, one of the most commonly deficient vitamins observed in IBD and crohn's patients as uptake is mainly oral and the main site of oral ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible