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6

You've actually asked two question: methods of cessation and length of nail recovery.There are several sources on the web that describe nail biting (NB) cessations methods, but many of them seem rather incomplete, unreliable, of from questionable sources (e.g. Prevention, Shape). I believe this article on NIH describes the many factors that contribute to the ...


4

The skin has 2 layers: epidermis (the outer) and dermis (the inner). Sliding down the rope may cause an abrasion in which only the epidermis is damaged. Scars develop only when the dermis is damaged. Fingerprints (Britannica): Each ridge of the epidermis (outer skin) is dotted with sweat pores for its entire length and is anchored to the dermis (inner ...


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If the picture above describes your question, then the condition is called leukonychia. Skin diseases such as psoriasis and vitiligo can cause white spots on your nails. The skin around your nails also whitens in response to vitiligo; your nails might be deformed and pitted in the case of psoriasis. Chronic kidney or liver disease can also manifest itself ...


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The pain in your finger may be due to a condition called RSI(Repetitive Strain Injury). I heard there could be many reasons for you to have an RSI. In this case you already mentioned that this finger is used mostly in typing. I had an RSI months back on my right pinky finger due to typing. I did some stretching exercises found on the internet which you ...


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Paronychia could be seen as an umbrella term for any inflammation around the nails of fingers or toes. Cellulitis being one kind. The umbrella term is referring to the anatomical region as it is Latin, from Greek [παρωνυχία] paronykhia "whitlow," from para- "beside" (see para- (1)) + onyx "nail" (see nail (n.)) + abstract noun ...


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So, immediately after a finger amputation has occured, your first steps in terms of providing first aid are going to be ensure the scene is safe and that there are no additional life threats to the patient so. Life threats being things such as not breathing/no pulse and severe bleeding. Now, for the finger... You're going to want to gently clean both the ...


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Go see an orthopedic surgeon; it's not exactly the most classical story but you might have some form of carpal tunnel syndrome. In most cases in can be effectively treated with rest, painkillers and stretching/exercise (so you don't get unnecessarily scared about the "surgeon" part); either way, considering it's your profession, I definitely think it is ...


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