Hot answers tagged

10

Nuts and legumes are an excellent source of fiber.1 2 If you're looking for the highest fiber content, here are the top candidates ranked by total grams of fiber (insoluble and soluble) per ounce3: Almonds: 2 g/oz Lentils (dried): 1.95 g/oz Pine nuts: 1.8 g/oz Pistachios: 1.7 g/oz Peanuts: 1.7 g/oz Beans (lima, kidney, soy etc.) 1.2 - 1.7 g/oz ...


7

As already pointed out, nuts and legumes make very good snacks. My only caution with the nuts is that they are also very calorie dense, so to have a filling snack you may add more calories than you would want. You can combine them with fruit, yogurt or other similar foods to make a healthy snack that isn't as high in calories per serving. If you want to ...


5

Essential nutrient means any substance normally consumed as a constituent of food which is needed for growth and development and/or the maintenance of life and which cannot be synthesized in adequate amounts by the body (fao.org). Dietary fiber does not meet the criteria of being needed for life/growth, so, strictly speaking, it is not an essential nutrient....


5

The question, as I understand it: Should the current recommendations about a low-FODMAP diet, which is also low-prebiotic and thus potentially harmful, be changed? Short answer: There is some evidence that a low-FODMAP diet can reduce symptoms in individuals with fructose malabsorption and irritable bowel syndrome but no clear evidence about its harms. So, ...


5

Like most foods, salt should be consumed in moderation. Your body needs salt, but a good idea would be to try and cut down salt from some other parts of your diet. For example, get unsalted fries or no ketchup. Check the daily recommended value for an estimate of how much salt you're intaking. Furthermore (thanks to Carey Gregory for pointing this out), ...


4

Modern evidence-based medicine won't be able to fully answer your question, but there are indications that bacteria, or more exactly, the individual gut flora heavily influence your fecal weight or stool mass. E.g., in obstipated patients, other types of gut bacteria were found than in the control group, which still can't tell what is cause and what is ...


3

In short: There is insufficient or conflicting evidence about the cancer-protecting effect of a high-fiber diet. Suggested mechanisms: Colorectal cancer: increased stool bulk and dilution of carcinogens in the colonic lumen, reduced transit time, and bacterial fermentation of fibre to short chain fatty acids [which are supposedly protective for colonic ...


3

No one really knows. A high fibre diet tends, however, to be lower in the foods associated with increased cancer risk. Fibre also reduces the colon transit time so that waste carcinogens have less time to contact the bowel mucosa. High fibre diets also might reduce breast cancer by binding to estrogens, and there's now a suggestion that phytates bind to ...


3

The label on the picture is wrong. Both fiber and sugar belong to carbohydrates, so sugars (5.1 g) + fiber (8.6 g) = 13.7 g carbohydrates, but the label says only 7.2 g. According to NutritionData, 100 g of dry roasted peanuts contain: 4.2 g sugars 8 g fiber 21.5 g carbohydrates The 9 g of carbohydrates that are not specifically mentioned is starch.


3

The bran (fiber) from whole-wheat flour slows down the movement of food from the stomach into the small intestine (gastric emptying), which results in slower glucose absorption. So, the glucose from whole-wheat flour (with fiber) is absorbed slower than the glucose from white flour (no fiber), which results in smaller blood glucose spikes after meals, which ...


2

The link @bummi provided is very helpful in understanding this. Here's a quote: While fibers are carbohydrates, they do not affect your body’s sugar/glucose levels or the levels of sugar related hormones such as insulin. In fact, high fiber meals take longer to digest and therefore, affect your blood glucose more slowly. This is why it is often ...


2

There are no negative consequences, IF you eat in the proper way. With this statement I am referring to eat every component of the diet, like carbs, fats, proteins, vitamins and of course fibers. This is essential. The main problem with people that eat lots of fibers, is that they feel full fast and usually won't eat all the proper components. Problems ...


2

Not at all. Studies have shown that a large amount of fibers is a protective factor against colo-rectal cancer for example. Actually, as you said, only effects are some digestive troubles, since fibers are cut and destroyed by bacterias in colon : those bacterias produce gas, that's why you might feel uncomfortable. But if you don't have that, go on ! One ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible