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11

It's actually the other way around. Oil coming from your pores causes dead skin cells to clump together, blocking the pore. Acne is a blocked or infected pore. When your skin is oily, the oil actually comes from pores that are not clogged. So the oil you feel when you touch your pimple (which BTW is a bad idea) is probably coming from surrounding pores . ...


6

Robin got it right, any extra oil, grease, dirt, or other foreign matter will aggravate pimples. I had a moderate acne problem through most of my teenage years, and here are some things I learned: Keep affected areas, especially face, as clean as possible. Do this by: a. scrubbing them well with soap daily; and b. thoroughly cleansing with rubbing alcohol ...


4

There are several components to this question: Is hydrogen peroxide (as used in dental hygiene procedures) absorbed into the body in significant quantities? Could absorbed hydrogen peroxide have systemic effects? To what extent is oxidative stress a factor in the pathogenesis of vitiligo? Can absorbed hydrogen peroxide contribute to the pathogenesis of ...


3

Simply put, it doesn't. Breaking the word prosopagnosia down you end up with: Prosop is rooted in Greek for face, and gnosis is knowledge (agnosia is therefore lack of knowledge, or ignorance, but not in a pejorative sense). There are tons of agnosias, which is defined as impairment of a single modality (like vision) from being able to process information ...


3

According studies, it's an interaction between genetics and environment. If you parents had acne, you might have. But, overall, diet and stress are big factors for acne : your genetic makes you more sensible to this. NCBI : Acne and food I don't understand if you talk about medical treatments or other... I will talk about medical treatments so. 2 classes of ...


2

Interesting question. I remember my professor of pharmaceutical technology and pharmaceutics addressing this when we discussed the significance of dosage form design. The skin on one’s face is far thinner and more sensitive than the skin on one’s body. The facial epidermis is about 0.12mm thick whereas on the body it averages around 0.6mm (nearly six-fold). ...


1

There are many possibilities here, but my first thought upon seeing the pictures and reading that it occurred after you increased your alcohol consumption was rosacea. It can be triggered by alcohol consumption. Certain foods can trigger it as well. You'll want to google "rosacea" and "rosacea triggers" because there's much more info out there than I can ...


1

In my experience, such warnings are typically present if ingredients in the lotion would irritate the eyes or mouth—problems that can't happen if you avoid applying it to the face. My reasoning goes as follows: The only significant difference between skin on one's face and elsewhere is the higher concentration of sebaceous glands that secrete oil, but since ...


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