7

While it used to be done, in reality anymore it isn't done as it is possible to damage the equipment by rubbing, and the possibility exists of an accidental discharge between paddles which can be dangerous for everyone around. In older times, conductive gel was applied directly to the paddles, and doctors/EMT's would rub the paddles together to distribute ...


6

H = IxIxR Where H is the amount of heat produced when a current of I is flown through a conductor of resistance R. The resistance of human body may be as high as 100,000 ohms. An average bolt produces current of 30kA. If a typical lightning were to pass completely through a human body (even though this is not the case), the heat energy liberated will be ...


4

Although I couldn’t find evidence-based literature concerning your specific use of TENS, I will try to give your some clarifications concerning your question: First, what is TENS: Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TENS) is the application of electrical current through electrodes placed on the skin. Varying frequencies can be applied, from low (< 10 ...


3

This is additional information for John's otherwise good answer. Although they're rarely used, it's still common to see paddles on the defibrillators used in EMS at the paramedic level. See those packs on the side of the unit in the photo below? In addition to cables, ECG pads, and defibrillator pads, there are paddles in there along with a tube of ...


3

Here's a brief overview of the types and characteristics of seizures: Epileptic Seizure: Is characterized by "torrents" of electrical discharges by groups of neurons. This temporarily blocks any other neural signals from reaching the CNS. You may lose consciousness, fall stiffly, and have uncontrollable jerking. Epilepsy is not associated with ...


3

There is an adage in electrical safety that "It is not the voltage that kills you, it is the current". This was investigated at Skeptics.SE. A review of literature regarding electrocution suggests 0.06 A to 0.07 A is fatal. That said, because of Ohm's law, voltage does play a role. Ohm's law says that V=IR, where V is voltage, I is current, and R is ...


2

Neither. You would either kill them with the first shock or just annoy them every day of their life. Human tissue can't adapt to electricity. It's either enough current to damage it or it's not. And if the path of the current is through the heart, the amount needed to disrupt the heart's electrical functioning is as little as 100 milliamps.


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