5

Terminology note: I am going on the assumption that by 'rheumatism' you are referring to rheumatoid arthritis, a chronic destructive inflammatory condition There is not good or sufficient evidence to suggest that 'Radon bathing' confers symptomatic benefit for rheumatoid arthritis (and possibly some other diseases) Is radon therapy a 'helpful therapy'? This ...


4

Maybe. Depends on the 95-year old... and the 25-year old. A heart failure diagnosis isn't just the process of getting older; it has objective criteria. I expect most 95-year olds would score above zero on this scale, many quite highly, but not all of them would. And, of course, we know there are 25-year olds who would score highly too, so I'd say it's a ...


4

Can aging of the heart be equivalent to having (mild) heart failure? Absolutely. A large part of aging is the process of telomeres shortening with each cell division, making our DNA more vulnerable. As more DNA damage accumulates, more cells in the heart (and everywhere else in the body) become dysfunctional - that's essentially what aging is. So while ...


3

There seems to be no scientific evidence to support the claim that diabetes type 2 generally goes away on its own (without drugs, diet or weight loss) in the elderly. According to one analytical article in BMJ, 2017, remission of diabetes type 2 is "currently very rarely achieved or recorded." In elderly, remission may be slightly more common. In a large ...


2

A device to constantly measure "vitals" such as pulse and blood oxygen would be expensive, possibly invasive (a pulse oximeter on your finger while you lie in a hospital bed is no big deal, but will really get in the way while you're cooking or gardening) and subject to many false positives, such as when the device slips or the person removes it. ...


1

1) The elderly are the most likely group to be on agents to regulate blood pressure as the incidence of hypertension increases with age. 2) The elderly are the most likely group to have altered large vessel vascular compliance due to atherosclerosis. Since your question relates to ATLS directly and shock indirectly, let's start from the beginning. For the ...


1

Cardiac Output (CO) = Heart Rate (HR) X Stroke Volume (SV) Decreases in CO > Decrease BP. Increases in CO > Increase BP. With aging CO remains stabilized at rest due to the following: Heart Rate (HR) (About the Same) Stroke Volume (SV) Increased Left Ventricular (LV) End Diastolic Volume (EDV) and LV hypertrophy results in increased SV. This SV ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible