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Stockholm Syndrome does exist. It has an exceptionally high face validity. It does have this attribute due to many case reports available in the non-medical newspapers. You see a pattern, you have a desire to name it. The trick of taxonomy is trying to explain this behaviour pattern, many psychological theories stand at the ready: Traumatic Entrapment, ...


3

One problem with this approach of seeking knowledge is the theoretical nature of the question itself: Unprotected fellatio, which has been practiced by all civilizations since mists of time, is now becoming a cause of concern due to the AIDS epidemic. Most of the sexually transmitted infectious diseases are concerned by fellatio and only few medical ...


1

I think this is probably due to selection bias, but I cannot find a source from someone in the field to reference. Instead, to support this conclusion, note that in the review you reference, the people with near-occlusions overall have fewer negative outcomes than those with lesser occlusions. People who are not already dead while having such a blockage ...


1

Stockholm Syndrome certainly does exist. It is a manifestation of capture-bonding, an evolutionary psychology[1] term for the evolved psychological mechanism[2] behind Stockholm syndrome. John Tooby (then a graduate student at Harvard University) originated the concept and its ramifications in the early 1980s, though he did not publish.[3] The term is ...


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