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10

Good question though a broad one! Well, it all depends on the 'pill' or 'medicine' you are on. Different medicines have different half-lives. And 'half-life' is the factor that mostly decides the 'dosage/timings'. But, if you go by general guidelines, all doctors agree upon one thing: Take a missed pill the moment you remember it. But then, if it is ...


7

Referring to published research, there is no known quota on drinking frequency since fluid intake from beverages and food in time period takes care of the total hydration status of an individual in a day. Daily consumption below the range of adequate intake of water may not produce harmful effects to the body because hydration is received from intake of ...


7

As you've stated BID = bis in die = twice a day. According to a standard dosage sheet from the University of Florida, BID = every 12 hours. However, I was reading a forum for nurses [See References] and there seems to be variations on BID (roughly 8-12 hours apart) depending on the hospital. If possible, contact your nurse/physician for the clearest ...


4

Generally, based on pharmacokinetics and safety or efficacy. Drugs are metabolized and eliminated from the body at some rate, with the rate and mechanism depending on the specific drug. Both acetaminophen (Tylenol) and ibuprofen have a half-life of around 2-4 hours, for example, and take about 1 hour after oral administration to reach peak serum levels. ...


4

Aspirin, just like all NDSAIDs, affects enzymes associated with pain transmission; they are COX-1 and COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-1 and 2). COX-1 helps protect the stomach and intestinal lining from the acids the stomach produces 1. Since NSAIDs inhibit the production of these enzymes, they also leave your stomach and intestinal lining somewhat unprotected from ...


3

First, we can't give advice specific to an individual on Health SE. See rules. BUT what I CAN do is help guide your next discussion with his doctor. (Those are great diagrams and will help your doctor when you and your dad go to see him/her. ) The first and most important question to understand is: why was he put on Prevacid (a protein pump inhibitor) in ...


3

Aspirin is a platelet inhibitor. As such it has a number of bleeding risks - including GI bleeding as described above. Risks also include increased bleeding risk from injury including cuts, bruising, or hitting your head and having a brain bleed. And actually, even without head trauma, an intracranial hemorrhage risk increases with the dose of aspirin. The ...


3

First of all, the leaflet in question also states: Your doctor will tell you how much Daktarin oral gel to take and for how long you should take it. It is essential that your therapy is supervised by a physician, primarily because infections of the stomach and the gut may be serious. The doctor can monitor how you respond to therapy in terms of ...


3

The main concern here is whether you took more than a recommended daily and more than a recommended single dose. That being said, people are different (in body mass, metabolism, health status etc.), so we can talk about probabilities, but not give a definite answer if something will happen. The doses for acetaminophene (paracetamol): The usual adult ...


2

1) Sodium is an essential nutrient so you need to consume it regularly. The safe minimum sodium intake for individuals who do not sweat excessively is said to be 200 mg sodium (500 mg salt) per day. Recommended Dietary Allowances: 10th Edition, 1989, minimum intake for salt: In consideration of the wide variation of patterns of physical activity and ...


2

Contact your physician and find out for sure from them. The ranges vary and are different for every women. Below is some answers, but you can't take important medical advice from the internet. Please contact your physician. How much folic acid should you take? 14 years and up - 400 micrograms/day Pregnant women - 600 micrograms/day ...


2

Commonly prescribed dose of aspirin for certain types of arthritis can be as high as 4 g/day (Drugs.com). For angina pectoris and heart attack prevention, even low doses (75-325 mg/day) can result in gastrointestinal bleeding (PubMed). According to one study (PubMed): Mini-dose aspirin...(75 mg/day), caused significant changes in renal function and ...


1

Actually, according to the official drug label found here, 3 out of 5 indications allow several dosage regimens that include those you asked about: 2.1 Treatment of Osteoporosis in Postmenopausal Women The recommended dosage is: one 70 mg tablet once weekly or one bottle of 70 mg oral solution once weekly or one 10 mg tablet once daily 2.2 Prevention of ...


1

The European Food Safety Authority lists a population reference intake of 9.5 mg/day for men and 7.0 mg/day for women. The same source lists a tolerable upper intake limit ("UL", a level that should be safe in the long term for everyone) of 25 mg/day for adults. Long-term intake of 50 mg/day has been shown to be enough to cause problems. One of those ...


1

Drugs may have different actions at different concentrations. So, for instance: Buprenorphine is 25 to 100 times more potent than morphine.18 Buprenorphine exhibits partial agonist behavior at the mu-receptor and exhibits antagonist behavior at the kappa-receptor. Buprenorphine has a strong affinity for the mu-receptor causing tight binding and therefore ...


1

The potential toxicity of vitamins varies enormously, but as a rough guide, fat soluble ones have a much higher potential to be stored in your body and build up to toxic levels whereas water soluble ones are likely to simply be flushed out in your urine. I would be wary of taking high doses of fat soluble vitamins over an extended period. See here.


1

You are right, too much zinc could be harmfull but in your case you are at the upper limit. Zinc supplements should not exceed 40mg per day for adults. You find all details here: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Zinc-Consumer/#h8 Hope this helps.


1

In a recent Time magazine article, they reference a 2015 study in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition about recommended water drinking frequency, "A randomized trial to assess the potential of different beverages to affect hydration status: development of a beverage hydration index:" Sipping water (or any other beverage) a little bit at a ...


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