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9

Roman Zieliński seems to be intentionally misleading you by making an implausible circumstance that is technically possible sound like a likely outcome. This strategy is not unusual among people who argue against vaccination, because they have very little actual science to argue based on. The Central Dogma as stated by Crick says nothing about RNA vs DNA. It ...


7

To supplement Bryan's answer (although I'm not going to say anything fundamentally different here), according to their proponents, mRNA vaccines are considered the safest genetic vaccines (in this integration regard) because mRNA transcription ("transfection") to proteins happens outside the nucleus. Quoting from a review mRNA vaccines do not ...


7

Yes, it is possible. In a bone marrow transplant, all of the patient's bone marrow is destroyed and replaced with donor marrow. Since red blood cells are created by bone marrow, the donor's blood type will determine which type of red cells are produced, as explained here: Does my blood type change after SCT or BMT? Yes. The recipients blood type ...


7

The short answer is maybe, but rarely, and the whole Covid virus has never been seen to integrate into the cell's DNA intact. Any integration requires "helper" molecules not found in the Covid virus, and only very rarely found in a normal cell. It's been known for many decades that RNA in a cell can be converted into DNA and integrated into the ...


5

Basically neither of your hypotheses is correct. A piece of mRNA isn't usually destroyed after one transcription. Nor does it create an "infinite loop" in the cell. Instead there's a balance between transcription and decay. The mechanisms for mRNA decay are fairly complex in themselves. (see link for details) For vaccines, it's obviously beneficial ...


5

What was once defined as 'scientific racism' is incompatible with what we know to be science or anthropology. Inter-group differences, supposed to be large in broad terms and used to qualify people, turned out to be much smaller than intra-group differences. And the classifications into 'better' or 'worse' turned out to be completely bogus. But that does not ...


4

Older paternal (and maternal) age in fact is associated with some increase in disease, though at fairly low rates. Cancer is largely a disease of probability. One does not need to have mutations in all of their cells to develop cancer, just one. But a parent does not pass on all their mutations in all their cells, they pass on just one, which need not have ...


3

Aciclovir is a prodrug, which means that it has to be converted to an active form before having its desired effect. It is converted to this active form (aciclovir triphosphate) by a process called phosphorylation. This process requires an enzyme called herpes simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase, which competes for endogenous deoxyguanosine ...


2

I would like to start by saying that 23andMe performs its genetic test in CLIA certified laboratory. Processes like DNA extraction, purification, measurement can only be done under laboratory conditions. Second, 23andMe provides you with ancestry and health information and also allows you to download your raw data. Your raw data information is txt or zip ...


1

Nobody knows. There are three main models for the effects of low-dose radiation. The mainstream model, and the most conservative of the three, is the linear no-threshold model. It assumes that high-dose effects can be linearly extrapolated clear down to zero (that is, zero dose has zero effect, any non-zero dose carries a non-zero level of risk). The most ...


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