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There are certain types of malocclusion that are have been shown to adversely affect quality of oral health and quality of life, but these are far, far fewer than the number of people sporting braces, adult or adolescent. The need for braces in the average teen, therefore, is no greater than the average adult. If you think of braces for teens as a necessity, ...


2

There are specialists who do different degrees of positional assessments - specifically orthodontists, dentists, or maxillofacial surgeons (usually those who specialize in TMJ). Also, some practicing D.O. physicians and massage therapists who specialize in cranial OMT may address positioning. OSA is not the only potential complication of poor mandibular ...


2

As I pointed out in the comments under your other related question, mandibular advancement devices are not a new idea. From my experience as a diagnosed sufferer of chronic OSA (Obstructive Sleep Apnoea), I underwent the home sleep study you described and it was not a "go/no go" test for CPAP, it was a yes/no test for sleep apnoea. It was suggested in 2014 ...


2

If the bracket is removed all the way and is not cemented you can remove it carefully. You should be fine but I have had this happen before. Just open the tiny latch on the bracket and place bracket in a safe place. If you cannot remove it mouthwash and a little floss or a Christmas tree brush will help clean behind it.


1

The quick answer is no, if you want to avoid crowding of the bottom teeth in the futur. The reason is that the mandible (jaw) is constantly being remodelled, as shown on the picture bellow. Notice how near the front teeth, who are in a kind of half-circle, the reformation is inward. The diameter of the arch (half-circle) is reduced throughout life, and ...


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