Hot answers tagged

7

Dairy products are not the best source of calcium for many reasons. Lactose Intolerance Lactose intolerant people can't have dairy products as they will usually cause various symptoms like diarrhea or cramping High Saturated Fat Content Most dairy products are high in saturated fat, which can be a risk factor for heart disease Milk has been able to cut ...


6

According to this study, no. We conclude that no statistically significant overall association can be detected between milk and dairy product intake and symptoms of mucus production in healthy adults, either asymptomatic or symptomatic, with rhinovirus infection. It seems that you're already aware of this given your comment: I've also read elsewhere ...


5

If the main thrust of the question is indeed expressed in the title and tags of the question: Q “There is a very strong correlation between consuming dairy products — such as milk — and acne, skin breakouts and aging.” Then the jury on that really isn't finished deciding: Is acne related to the ingestion of dairy products? It is not a new idea. It ...


5

These are biologically plausible effects supported by moderate quality observational evidence. As a personal aside, I do not believe there is enough evidence for harm to recommend eliminating dairy products from a healthy person's diet. A full discussion of all the evidence for the impact of dairy in diet is beyond the scope of this answer, though, so lets ...


5

The issue whether “excess” dietary protein intake adversely affects bone in humans is a subject of current controversy in nutrition(1),(2),(3) with one group concluding that “excess protein will not harm the skeleton if the calcium intake is adequate”(3) and group that “excessive dietary protein from foods with high potential renal acid load (e.g., animal ...


4

The worst case scenario is death from complications due to bacterial food poisoning. The specific species' will vary by location. Here in the UK, food poisoning from meat and dairy products are most commonly due to Enterobacteriaceae (esp E coli), Campylobacter and Salmonella. Common symptoms include diarrhoea, vomiting, stomach cramps, elevated temperature, ...


4

First, let me highly commend your wife. The WHO recommendation for breastfeeding up to 2yr is not for show. It really can help prevent a whole slew of problems. Unfortunately, no there are no ways to maintain lactase production in a prolonged lactose free diet. She may get extremely luckily and maintain the bacteria that are needed on her own, but she ...


3

As you imply in your question, enzymes are catalysts, and as such, participate in a chemical reaction but remain unchanged after that reaction is completed. Therefore, once lactase has converted a lactose molecule into galactose and glucose, it is free to split another. According to this website, lactase can split up to sixty lactose molecules each second, ...


3

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27271361 This study expands on the possibility of certain metabolites found in dietary milk may contribute highly to Single Nucleotide Polymorphism SNP formations. Dietary milk are given primarily to developing organisms, and for that concentrations of growth hormones as well as precursors that transform into growth hormone ...


3

You certainly don't require milk in your diet. Those with allergies need to avoid it. The whole thing is about getting the nutrients that the body needs. If you replace them with sufficient alternative sources, you'll be fine. Don't forget the calcium, the added vitamin D, etc. that's in milk: All very important building blocks for a healthy life. ...


2

First of all, I'm not sure whether the question is answerable at all without a more detailed scenario. So we have: Ca²⁺ excretion increasing with excess protein This seems to be linked to elimination of excess acids rather than directly to protein according to http://jn.nutrition.org/content/141/3/391.long. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15546911 ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible