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11

That problem is already solved for you, at least in the US. Current guidelines issued by the American Heart Association no longer require rescue breathing. Chest compressions alone are now the standard for community CPR (vs professional CPR). They refer to it as hands only CPR. On an anecdotal note, I've done mouth-to-mouth on a perfect stranger. He was a ...


10

Note: The following is excerpted from an article written in 2005. For lay (Non trained) people, there are more updated recommendations. The following is an example of the process, not the current recommendations. To be effective, CPR must restore adequate coronary and cerebral blood flow. Interruptions in chest compressions lower coronary perfusion ...


7

Asthma can lead to shortage of breath and in severe cases to death by suffocation (called asthmatic asphyxia). Failure of breathing inherently involves that the heart rate stops (called cardiac arrest). A victim who is unresponsive and not breathing normally is in cardiac arrest and requires CPR. European Resuscitation Council, New Guidelines 2015 p. 82 So,...


7

During approximately 50% of cardiac arrests, the patient continues to breathe for a time. However, this breathing is known as agonal respiration and is essentially gasping for air. This gasping is actually beneficial if CPR can be started while it is still occurring, it is believed that this may increase the chances of survival during a cardiac arrest ...


7

The MOLST (Medical Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment) form is an update to the non-hospital DNR, which as you saw in a previous answer has very stringent (and frankly unrealistic) requirements. The MOLST is printed on bright pink paper, and EMS providers are trained to look for it upon entering a house. In addition, patients are able to wear a metal ...


7

With a very small budget If you do not want to spend any (or very little) money on it, I recommend filling a small garbage bag with wet sand and then placing a cushion or pillow over it. I'm guessing if you want to add a realistic touch, you could place some small sticks of wood in the garbage bag to act as ribs. Unfortunately, the above answer is all ...


7

Adult pads have a larger area. And they provide more energy. The higher energy is needed because most adults have more body mass than children. Lower energy is more suitable for children. Source I teach CPR according to the European standards (ERC). You can use an AED with adult pads on a child, but you should put one pad on the front and the other on the ...


6

The only thing that keeps a patient in cardiac arrest alive is constant, high-quality chest compression. Cardioversion ("shocking") of a patient aims to return the heart to normal (sinus) rhythm in the case that a cardiac arrest is due to a dysrhythmia. If it works, great - return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) will be achieved and there will be signs ...


6

The timing of the first defibrillation attempts depends mostly on when defibrillation is detected. If it is witnessed - that is, the patient is being monitored and the alarm goes off, you're right there at the bedside, and the patient is in V Fib, it's fine to shock first. However, whereas this used to be the norm - shock first - it no longer is, partly ...


5

If the patient is breathing normally, stop CPR. Image Source: Official Guidelines of the European Resuscitation Council, latest edition: 2015. Section 2, p.88 The part that made me personally most suspicious in the article was that the patient supposedly breathed for 4 minutes without pulse. However, she did not take the crucial step of checking for a ...


5

"Giving" electrical current to the heart does not necessarily translate to mechanical contractions. The excitation-contraction coupling (as the sequence of electrical activation an muscle contraction is officially called), is not always a guarantee. A cardiac arrest in many cases mirrors severe malfunction on the level of the micro-structures of the heart ...


5

In Europe we use 30/2 for adults and 15/2 for children. For children heart problems are rare, so the focus lies on breathing (we also start with 5 breaths). With adults the focus lies on chest compressions, hence the double amount. There is a lot of research going on and as a result of the research, the guidelines are changed, each 5 years. (Last time the ...


5

The above answer is correct: no they can't function independently. I want to build on that answer with a couple additional points. Consider that your heart beats while you hold your breath - but it needs oxygen, so if your lungs stop for a long time they aren't exchanging O2 and CO2 so your heart muscle will eventually stop. Conversely if your heart stops,...


5

You're overlooking one important point: Both the heart and lungs are living tissue too, and without both circulating blood and oxygen they will die just like all the other tissues in the body. So no, neither one can continue to function without the other. As for CPR, I don't see how anything would change. Without circulating blood in the lungs, no gas ...


4

If the cord is the only reason that prevents the baby to start breathing spontaneously and the baby is otherwise healthy then the situation could resolve as you assumed. Two breaths could suffice, because they are needed only to initiate natural breathing and not to overcome any underlying disorder. Various resuscitation guideliness recommend 2 or 5 breaths ...


4

There are several studies that emphasize the importance of providing rapid and deep compressions and that CPR should resume immediately after the shock given by the AED, without the delay entailed in checking for pulse or rhythm conversion. Here is an excerpt from one of the studies: "After a successful shock, the rescuer was expected to assess the ...


4

Mechanically, if you have good enough foot control to be able to meet compressions guidelines, then a compression is a compression. But there are a few things to consider. Most importantly, what a good compression is and how to achieve it, and whether you can achieve it with your foot. To begin, CPR guidelines are updated regularly based upon research into ...


2

The British came across this exact problem. CPR was seen as a tricky business, especially when it was considered complicated and might involve mouth-to-mouth. Their solution was (as Carey Gregory mentioned) to recommend chest-compressions in time to a relatively popular (and more importantly, catchy) song. Their logic was that even a simple step like that ...


2

1) What happens to the heart in cardiac arrest? During a cardiac arrest, the electrical and mechanical activity is compromised (either one or both) such that the heart does not pump blood sufficiently to sustain life. This can be either due to an abnormal electrical rhythm, such as ventricular fibrillation, or a condition such as hypovolemic shock where ...


1

You may be describing the Silverster method and perhaps of use when there's a concern about Covid-19 In the 19th century, Doctor H. R. Silvester described a method (The Silvester Method) of artificial ventilation in which the patient is laid on their back, and their arms are raised above their head to aid inhalation and then pressed against their chest to ...


1

I am a certified CPR trainer. The purpose of CPR is to keep the circulation running such that the vital organs receive enough oxygen to survive the period until the medical professionals take over. We literally buy time for the victim. If there is a serious injury such that a significant part of the available blood is pushed out of the body, we have to ...


1

If an otherwise healthy person has a do not resuscitate order and has a heart attack and the ambulance comes, will they just let him die like that? Or is do not resuscitate only applicable to terminally ill people? This is a very interesting question. And as a non-American, I am quite shocked by the answer. To begin with, what you are essentially asking is ...


1

If the person has a valid out of hospital DNR order, then that person should not be resuscitated if they experience a cardio respiratory arrest. In that case the person clearly is not healthy. The DNR order has to be reviewed every 90 days by the person's doctor. And in the event of an arrest can be overridden by a relative or physician where the person is ...


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