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6

No it's not zero, even in the US. The March 20 Vox report is talking about the clinical trials, which were conducted on tens of thousands of people, who were generally healthy. In the subsequent rollout in the US, some vaccinated people have died as CNN reported in mid-April: About 5,800 people who have been vaccinated against coronavirus have become ...


5

Astrazeneca uses a modified chimpanzee adenovirus vector. Sputnik uses a modified hybrid human adenovirus vector. Since many (most?) humans have been previously exposed to human adenoviruses (but not chimp adenoviruses), some will have previously-existing antibodies and cellular immunity that may be enough to block a human-adenovirus-based vaccine from fully ...


5

This question is clearly answered by the CDC's "Myths and Facts about COVID-19 Vaccines" Will getting a COVID-19 vaccine cause me to test positive for COVID-19 on a viral test? No. None of the authorized and recommended COVID-19 vaccines cause you to test positive on viral tests, which are used to see if you have a current infection.​


2

"Is it a good idea to mix and match COVID-19 vaccines? Experts aren't so sure" https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronavirus/is-it-a-good-idea-to-mix-and-match-covid-19-vaccines-experts-aren-t-so-sure-1.5252873 Barry Pakes does not have a safety concern per se but is concerned about efficacy being compromised. Later in the article Dr. Isaac Bogoch, ...


1

No, because they don't have exactly the same DNA and the same history of exposure to pathogens, etc. Thinking about such issues in terms of ethnicity is not helpful because our DNA is so different, no matter whether or not we consider ourselves as the same ethnicity as someone else. With roughly 6 billion DNA "letters" in each of our cells, "...


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