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Yes, it is possible that one gradually develops chronic pancreatitis after a single attack of acute pancreatitis. Pancreatitis (NIDDK) The chronic form of pancreatitis can be triggered by one acute attack that damages the pancreatic duct. The damaged duct causes the pancreas to become inflamed. Scar tissue develops and the pancreas is slowly ...


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The following is what I have found, which shows promise on your hypothesis. Yanmaz, at al. (2012) found an increased prevalence rate of [Fibromyalgia Syndrome] in patients with [diabetes mellitus] type 2 and [rheumatoid arthritis]. There was no correlation between the prevalence rate of [Fibromyalgia Syndrome] and good [diabetes mellitus] disease control. ...


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According to this 2016 Nature Review article (which cites the article from your link): Androgens have been show to reduce immune response in a variety of studies. For example: In vivo exposure to testosterone reduces NK cell activity in mice [1] In vivo and in vitro exposure to testosterone decreases TLR4 expression on macrophages in mice [2] Testosterone ...


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When the rabies virus is spread to a new host, it first attacks muscle cells, which prevents the host's immune system from recognizing the invasion. Next, it binds to neurons at neuromuscular junction. Rabies virus is neurotropic, thus it binds preferentially to neurons, specifically the acetylcholine receptors on neurons. After binding the neuromuscular ...


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Yes, it's true. A relationship does exist between grinding the teeth and sleep apnea. The term bruxism(sleep bruxism) is used for grinding the teeth during sleep at night. In a study it was seen that the patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome also demonstrated with sleep bruxism. Interestingly treating the sleep apnea syndrome may also prevent sleep ...


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1) The elderly are the most likely group to be on agents to regulate blood pressure as the incidence of hypertension increases with age. 2) The elderly are the most likely group to have altered large vessel vascular compliance due to atherosclerosis. Since your question relates to ATLS directly and shock indirectly, let's start from the beginning. For the ...


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Cardiac Output (CO) = Heart Rate (HR) X Stroke Volume (SV) Decreases in CO > Decrease BP. Increases in CO > Increase BP. With aging CO remains stabilized at rest due to the following: Heart Rate (HR) (About the Same) Stroke Volume (SV) Increased Left Ventricular (LV) End Diastolic Volume (EDV) and LV hypertrophy results in increased SV. This SV ...


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