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Hard stool that stays in the colon for more than a couple of days is called "fecal impaction." Most medical sources recommend treating it with manually removing the stool (by a doctor, if necessary) and using rectally administrated enemas: Softening of hardened stool and stimulation of evacuation with enemas and suppositories is often helpful...Most ...


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The major dietary causes are not enough water and not enough fibre. (See the Risk Factors section of this Mayo Clinic article, which focuses on medical causes of constipation.) There's nothing complicated about mystery little factors in your food that combine to create a problem. If you eat only white rice and meat for a meal, with no vegetables, then you ...


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SE Health is not meant for personal advice. Only your doctor can answer this question based on an evaluation of your medical conditions, medications, allergies, and physical exam. What I can do is guide you toward the right resources. Make a list of these things you are on, a list of your medical history, a list of medication or food reactions you've had ...


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This saccharide is of very minute risk, absolutely, and even more so if compared with glucose, fructose or saccharose. Two reasons: Caries is the result of microbiota producing acids which dissolve the enamel, and this effect is enhanced when this takes place under plaque when and where saliva cannot dilute the acids For reason 1: Most bacteria tested ...


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This is not a medical recommendation, you should speak to your doctor. Generally speaking, paraffin oil, lactulose syrup and dietary fiber supplements are common OTC medications for constipation. It is important to drink plenty of water (specifically with added fiber). For individual advice, talk to your doctor.


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