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1. Measure blood concentration over time through IV administration First you need to administer a drug in a manner that has 100% bioavailability, or completely enters the systemic circulation. This is achieved through intravenous (IV) administration of the drug. One then measures the plasma concentration of the drug over time to derive what's called Area ...


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In professional terms, you're asking about pharmacokinetics - what fate does a drug have once administered and how fast does it get there. Yes, for some drugs, the goal is to keep a roughly steady concentration of the drug. For example, if you were taking a medication to regulate high blood pressure, you'd want it acting fairly constantly all the time, ...


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That study does indeed exist, and several outlets (1, 2, 3, 4) refer to it. It was conducted by Yoshihiko Koga, a japanese psychiatrist and professor at Kyorin University. It was originally cited, but not linked to, in the japanese website Excite.co.jp. I could not, however, find a link to the paper itself. The abovementioned outlets link to the supposed ...


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You would have a history of seizures even if they occured 5 years ago. Histories of disorders go back decades(your lifetime), especially if there is risk of recurrence as in cancer or seizures. Amazon.com Use cautiously in patients with history of seizures, based on reports of seizures due to gingko seed ingestion. Since you need to use it cautiously ...


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well once I woke up that was easy to find These short-term declines stem from temporary changes in the brain rather than cold or flu symptoms themselves, he said. Seasonal viruses reduce mental alertness by interfering with neurotransmitters such as noradrenaline, associated with reaction times. https://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-...


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Ferritin levels of 21 ug/L are on the extreme lower edge of the normal range. You can think about iron stores as follows. A healthy person will have iron stores of a few grams. Since iron is present in every cell of the body, we lose iron via the loss of dead skin cells, mucus, sweat etc. etc. The iron in red blood cells is recycled when they die, so we don'...


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It may be caused by excessive energy used to defeat the viruses or adverse bacteria-the triggers of cold and flu. Your body lacks enough energy to operate the physical activity, which affects the oxygen transmitting to your brain, so you could feel tired or fatigue to think or finish a simple motion. Also, cold medicines commonly have certain side effects ...


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In addition to Narusan's comment on exercise, it's important to consider diet too. Sometimes a lack of concentration and mental alertness can result from lower-than-usual energy levels, which can in turn be caused by poor dietary choices. NHS Choices stresses that eating well (as in a healthy, balanced diet) is preferable to taking supplements when trying ...


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