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Studies have shown that arthritis (joint inflammation) and arthralgias (joint pain) are reported in up to 95 percent of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). There is currently no evidence for the use of collagen supplements in lupus patients. Actually, some decades ago, these supplements have been suggested in patients with osteoarthritis. The ...


3

Albumin is expensive and potentially dangerous, colloids have never been shown to be better than crystalloids, and there is no good evidence for their effective use in orthostatic hypotension. Albumin, due to its cost and the traceability requirements inherent to all blood-derived products, is rarely prescribed as first-line treatment 1 Synthetic ...


1

Easy answer is simply "we don't know". The burden of proof is on the manufacturer, who probably will never spend the millions to know. But since it is a nutritional agent, one does not have to substantiate claims, just print it up and sell em. But if you think eating collagen will help joints and tendons, you must also believe that eating teeth will help ...


1

Gelatin is made up of proteins derived from collagen, a protein that is heavily used in our bones and joints, among other things. According to this study, which was done in rats: The relative and absolute bioavailability of gelatin were 74.12% and 85.97%, respectively. It goes on to say that about 42% of gelatin was absorbed from the intestine as ...


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