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Why it has been long assumed that caffeine or coffee is dehydrating? Because caffeine is a mild diuretic - it stimulates water excretion through the kidneys. But the amount of water you consume with caffeinated drinks is usually greater than the amount of water you lose in urine due to caffeine diuretic effect, so there is no net water loss and hence no ...


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While coffee in large amounts can stimulate urine production, it's not enough to produce a dehydration effect, especially in people accustomed to drinking caffeine. This recent study compared 50 male coffee drinkers in short trials both with and without caffeine, and concluded that in coffee accustomed males, coffee had much the same hydrating effects as ...


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Your question demonstrates a key understanding of homeostatic mechanisms: in many cases, long-term pharmaceutical modulation leads to compensatory changes that blunt the effects of the modulation. This can lead to rebound effects and sometimes physical/physiological dependence. Your hypothesis is good, however, you have the mechanism wrong in this case. ...


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The conclusion of the mentioned systematic review with meta‐analysis: coffee consumption and the risk of cirrhosis (Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 2016): This meta‐analysis suggests that increasing coffee consumption may substantially reduce the risk of cirrhosis. They say coffee may reduce the risk of cirrhosis, not that it can treat it. ...


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Caffeine comes from coffee beans, but it can also be synthesized in a laboratory. Caffeine has the same structure whether it’s in Coffee, Energy Drinks, Tea or pills/powder. Caffeine dosages should be tailored to individuals. If you are new to caffeine supplements then the usual recommended start is with a 100mg dose (see warning below). Typically, 200mg ...


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There are some conflicting results concerning the effect of caffeine on nausea. One study 1 reported that caffeine withdrawal is associated with nausea and vomiting which might suggest that caffeine might reduce nausea. However, two years ago, a study 2 was conducted in postoperative care to reduce nausea and vomiting after general anesthesia by ...


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Answer: No Summary Metabolic effects of caffeine may vary depending on whether one is 'naive' to caffeine (infrequent user) or 'accustomed' to caffeine (daily user). Metabolic effects may also vary due to genetics, specifically a polymorphism on the CYP1A1/2 enzyme (1) One review notes that, after looking at the differences in metabolism between humans ...


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I am not an expert, but I am going to write up what I think. Note that there is a Coffee Stack Exchange if you later have non-health related questions about coffee. Caffeine has some positive effects, but also some negative effects. The positive effects seem to be linked to better mood and concentration, and preventing a number of cancers and Type II ...


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I have found an article published in November 2017 that states: "Evidence supported consumption of ≤400 mg/day in adults is not associated with overt, adverse effects." Link to the article: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0278691517301709 You can see the meaning of 400 mg of caffeine at this webpage: https://www.foodinsight.org/...


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It is very difficult to prove a negative. This is true both because there always exists the possibility of a small effect that a given study is underpowered to find, and because of the chronic issue with reporting negative results in biomedical literature and science in general (that is, experiments with a negative result are less likely to be published). ...


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As a type 1 diabetic I have noticed even black coffee can have an effect on blood sugar. Coffee( the caffeine really) increases your blood epinephrine (adrenaline) levels. Adrenaline has the same effect as glucagon .They stimulate the breakdown of glycogen into glucose


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Diet soda isn't inherently bad for you: http://examine.com/nutrition/is-diet-soda-bad-for-you/ It's hard to come up with any conclusive statements about caffeine; it is an incredibly well researched topic, but the immense social usage of it and creeping biases make it hard to pick a side on things outside of non-applied biochemistry. The dosages of ...


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