9

The American Heart Association no longer condemns eggs in its guidelines. But it does recommend that people limit themselves to 300 milligrams of cholesterol daily (a single egg has about 200 milligrams of cholesterol, as well as a mix of saturated and unsaturated fats, including the monounsaturated kind found in olive oil). The federal government, in its ...


6

Levels generally increase until the ages of 50-60, then fall. In children, levels of LDL and HDL generally either rise or fall monotonically (i.e. continuously) over childhood; see Dai et al. (2009). LDL-C was found to decrease in both genders, while HDL-C was found to increase in girls and fluctuate in boys. The NIH says of adults Blood cholesterol ...


5

The NHS page you linked to does quite a good job of explaining why the study that puts forward the claim that there isn't a link doesn't actually quite say that with any degree of certainty. They are a bit wishy-washy about it and the British Heart Foundation takes a somewhat tougher stance LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), along with other types of cholesterol are ...


5

The mentioned paper has been published in BMJ Open in 2015: The Association Between Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Mortality in the Elderly. A systematic review. The NHS article mentions the limitations of the review: only participants older than 60 years were included, only LDL (but not HDL) cholesterol was investigated, the effect of statins (...


4

The current outlook is: Dietary cholesterol is largely a non-issue still overburdened with much anxiety and even hysteria. While certain levels and ratios of "blood cholesterol" (different lipoproteins, triglycerides etc.) are still treated as indicators of possible trouble that may call for intervention, that intervention is likely pharmacological ...


4

Some of the oils in coffee (terpenes, in particular kahweol and cafestol) are believed to be the source of its effect on cholesterol.[1, 2, 3, 4] There are two ways to cut down on intake of cholesterol-influencing terpenes: Switch to filtered coffee. The terpenes are mostly retained in the paper filter instead of going into your drink. At the same time, ...


4

In the following, I assume you meant total cholesterol and not HDL or LDL-cholesterol. Low cholesterol can be found in some rare genetic diseases, and in people affected by other illnesses. For example, hyperthyroidism will cause low cholesterol because it fastens the metabolism and increases the use of lipids in general. Any illness that involves ...


4

According to a couple of systematic reviews of studies, there is insufficient evidence about the lowering effect of vitamin D on blood cholesterol levels. Vitamin D, Evidence Mayo Clinic (data from Natural Standard Research Collaboration) Many studies have looked at the effects of vitamin D alone or in combination with other agents for high cholesterol,...


4

Your question about why any individual physician chooses to practice a specific way is not answerable, but the underlying question about how physicians use evidence to make decisions is what I will address. This is from a perspective in the USA, but I believe that much of this applies globally. (But please feel free to add answers from other countries, as ...


4

Gary Taubes, the journalist and advocate, did publish such an article: Gary Taubes: "The Soft Science of Dietary Fat", Science, New Series, Vol. 291, No. 5513 (Mar. 30, 2001), pp. 2536-2541+2543-2545 (jstor) (available at the author's page) In that article, which is solidly written but not a study, more of an opinion piece, the author argues ...


3

"The net daily synthesis of cholesterol is equal to the amount of cholesterol lost in the feces minus the dietary cholesterol" The body synthesizes an amount approximately equal to the amount it absorbs Source: Balancing Cholesterol Synthesis and Absorption in the Gastrointestinal Tract David E. Cohen, M.D., Ph.D. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/...


2

No. It is not possible "that reducing cholestrol would lead to a direct, causational decrease in cortisol production?" There is a little and a bigger flaw in this thought. Cholesterol is not "bad" and it is not an essential nutrient. That means, reduced intake of this substance results usually just in increased synthesis of that substance. Cholesterol (...


2

Some doctors think there is not enough evidence that low cholesterol levels are harmful. Ask the doctor: Is my LDL cholesterol too low? (Harvard.edu, 2012) There really isn't evidence of harm from driving your LDL too low. In the past, some scientists worried that extremely low LDL levels could result in blood vessel ruptures and perhaps increase the ...


2

If you are worried about the sodium: WHO recommends a reduction to <2 g/day sodium (5 g/day salt) in adults (strong recommendation). from the "Sodium intake for adults and children" guideline by the World Health Organisation. This is for healthy adults, sick people may need further restriction. This means that ~15 grams of these wings would hit ...


1

Eating cholesterol is bad for the body, and this why people are saying otherwise . Eating any kind of saturated fat is bad even unsaturated fats should only be used in small amounts. The only fats the body needs are the Omega-3 and Omega-6 essential fatty acids, but we only need a few grams per day of these. To understand the problems with eating ...


1

I am not clear as to how soon an intervention results in changes but in some trials people have tested within 2 weeks. I typically retest people at three weeks to provide reinforcement for a dietary intervention.


1

The quality of evidence is not really the best (taken from a management guideline) but I frankly doubt there is any better-quality evidence to answer this question: https://guideline.gov/summaries/summary/48406 says, Follow-up of People Started on Statin Treatment Measure total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and non-HDL cholesterol in all people who ...


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