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TL;DR Free sugars are all instances were sugar can be avoided and is not essential. It is encouraged to cut down the free sugars intake because sugar has many negative health effects: Sugar increases the risk of obesity is linked to diabetes is linked to fatal cardiovascular disease encourages caries is linked to the Alzheimer’s disease is linked to ADHD ...


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One important factor is that you have to be certain that your weight caused not by sickness or disorder, i.e. doctor told you that weight gain caused only by improper food intake. The short and general answer is that weight control is not directly intuitive link between sugar and "fat" intake and outcomes in weight measurements. E.g. wikipedia article on ...


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Technically, the only thing needed for weight loss is a caloric deficit. Comparison of Weight-Loss Diets with Different Compositions of Fat, Protein, and Carbohydrates (NEJM, 2009): Reduced-calorie diets result in clinically meaningful weight loss regardless of which macronutrients they emphasize. The other question is, which foods are most satiating. ...


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In summary, there is a strong evidence to say that the risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) include: High LDL-cholesterol Insulin resistance High saturated/unsaturated fat intake ratio and high trans fat intake High intake of refined carbohydrates High LDL-cholesterol and CVD The Role of Lipids and Lipoproteins in Atherosclerosis (Comprehensive ...


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There seems to be no scientific evidence to support the claim that diabetes type 2 generally goes away on its own (without drugs, diet or weight loss) in the elderly. According to one analytical article in BMJ, 2017, remission of diabetes type 2 is "currently very rarely achieved or recorded." In elderly, remission may be slightly more common. In a large ...


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The label on the picture is wrong. Both fiber and sugar belong to carbohydrates, so sugars (5.1 g) + fiber (8.6 g) = 13.7 g carbohydrates, but the label says only 7.2 g. According to NutritionData, 100 g of dry roasted peanuts contain: 4.2 g sugars 8 g fiber 21.5 g carbohydrates The 9 g of carbohydrates that are not specifically mentioned is starch.


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Note: This explanation does not concern itself with body health, wellbeing, the ability to follow/sustain the diet short/long term, impact to nervous system or the psychological impact of satiety that low-carb diets can offer. It only concerns itself with the imaginary scenario of two identical subjects following the same total calorie diet but with macro-...


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Yes, it is a typo. 100 g of this wrap has 161 Kcal: Fat contributes 9 Kcal x 4.3 g = 39 Kcal Protein contributes 4 Kcal x 12.3 g = 49 Kcal Because there are 161 Kcal in total, the remaining 73 Kcal needs to come from 18.25 g of carbohydrate (4 Kcal/g). (Fat = 9 Kcal/g, protein and carbohydrate = 4 Kcal/g)


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The link @bummi provided is very helpful in understanding this. Here's a quote: While fibers are carbohydrates, they do not affect your body’s sugar/glucose levels or the levels of sugar related hormones such as insulin. In fact, high fiber meals take longer to digest and therefore, affect your blood glucose more slowly. This is why it is often ...


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The reason why some people say this is because consuming carbs causes insulin levels to rise and insulin inhibits fat metabolism. In the opposite case when type 1 diabetic patients don't take insulin (e.g. when they are ill and not eating well), they are at risk of diabetic ketoacidosis. This is caused by the fat metabolism going in overdrive due to lack of ...


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Scientists still aren't sure, but it seems carbohydrates may be easily converted into fat, depending on the form, or promote fat storage through stimulating insulin. Nutrition Science and Applications (2nd E) by Smolin and Grosvenor, in Chapter 4, page 140 covers this question well. Carbohydrates in and of themselves are not “fattening.” They provide 4 ...


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The question is a quite broad since you don't state whether you mean a ketogenic diet, levels of protein and fats, or what you mean by "athletic and mental performance" so I will answer quite generally. There is some anecdotal limited evidence that shows unhindered athletic performance on a Low Carb diet, such as observations made on Innuit people prior to ...


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There are a wide variety of starch sources, from refined flours with a high glycemic index (e.g. white crackers or bread) to whole grains and nuts with lower glycemic index, high fiber, and many other nutrients. The body processes them differently even if they have ultimately the same # of calories or starches. Therefore in the field of medicine, one of ...


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Carbs are not necessarily fattening as many studies comparing low carb diets to one recommended by the FDA with a higher calorie content going to carbs, have found negligible differences in fat loss. Of course, there is another side to the story. The synthesis of adipose tissue is regulated by the level of sugar in the blood, or rather the level of insulin....


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In the bodybuilding scene, the logic that you need to consume carbohydrates to build muscles is this: Protein calories will be used as an energy source when the body is lacking fat or carbohydrate calories for fuel. When the body receives sufficient quantities of proteins, fats and carbohydrates, protein will carry out its specific functions. Note, ...


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When you eat 100 g of basmati rice and take on 120 calories you've had a "meal/snack" that's 1.2 calories/g (calories per gram) in energy density. An avocado might be 136 grams in weight (without seed) and contain 227 calories. If you eat two avocados then you can calculate that (assuming these numbers are accurate) you've eaten 272 grams (136 g x 2) of ...


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Imagine that your arteries are hallways and that your muscle cells are apartments with doors withing those hallways. When glucose enters your bloodstream, the body says, "Hey pancreas! There is energy in the hallways, I need insulin!" Imagine insulin like agents who come and unlock the doors. The energy then gets into your muscle cells and you are full of ...


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There is a much simpler reason why bulking up on carbs is good in general, also for bodybuilding. Your body needs energy, and hole grain carbs are a healthy source of energy, as its loaded with vitamins, minerals and fiber. The alternative would be to eat fat for energy but this has two drawbacks. The first drawback is that fat is pretty much an empty ...


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Correct me if I'm wrong but, the sort of sugar consumption that gets a bad rap is the consumption of simple sugars that result in empty calories. In other words, the consumption of sugar-laden, low-nutrient foods. Sugary drinks form a fine example, from pops to fruit juices: In an 8 fl. oz. serving of cranberry juice, I might consume 35g sugar. I don't get ...


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Generally, Whole grain bread with the most fiber and protien, with the shortest ingredients list with no preservatives, colors, sugar, would be best. Fiber and protein help you feel full longer and can help you cut down on additional junk snacking. Source: http://www.webmd.com/diet/video/truth-about-bread


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Potatoes have are a great source of many minerals and a healthy option for a carbohydrate. They may raise your blood sugar rather quickly, but so will your typical pasta. If you eat the skin, that is a decent source of fiber, so that should slow the absorption of the carbs. Potatoes are actually significantly higher in potassium than bananas, go figure. ...


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Individual Results Vary Some people only eat food 30 points or lower on the Insulin Index. Low carb, medium protein, high fat. This is usually where the ketosis plays in, but is usually only necessary for people with a high carb addiction, and they should taper down very slowly. Other people are vegan and might do the above or the below. While others need ...


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