14

There have been quite a few studies on the influence of meal frequency, but usually they focus on weight loss. I could find one pilot study comparing people receiving either one or three meals a day, for a total of 8 weeks, while receiving the same amount of calories in total. All study subjects maintained their body weight. The study concluded: There ...


10

Ethanol is caloric and is neither a carbohydrate, protein, or fat.


9

Answer: 1 Kilocalorie equals 1 Calorie. Note the capital "C". 1 kilocalorie equals 1000 calories. Note the lowercase "c". So Calories and kilocalories are pretty much the same thing. Kilocalories It's easy to get confused about calories and kilocalories since, in a nutrition context, values are actually given for the number of kilocalories in a food, ...


8

You seem to be equating food weight with body weight, and they are not directly related. Yes, if you eat a pound of something, you will immediately weigh one more pound, as your body has not had a chance to digest it and process it as needed. However, that doesn't mean that you will have gained one permanent pound. The body will break down the food, ...


7

Generally speaking, 1 kilocalorie = 1000 calories (definition here). But the confusing part is explained here: The energy used in physical activity and the energy stored in foods is actually given in kilocalories (the heat energy required to raise the temperature of one kilogram of water by one degree Celsius). Often kilocalories are referred to as kcals ...


7

First of all, the 1000-2500 calorie statement from the answer to this question is not due to formula inaccuracies (only 0.5% of the variation were attributed to that), but is the actual measured BMR in a study within Scottish population. Second, we know from the above mentioned question in SE that the BMR is dependent, amongst others, of fat-free body mass (...


4

Yes it can. As a general statement, I'm not sure how much it can go down before it's a problem, which is what I think you are asking as your second question. Starving to death might be seen as this taking the BMR close to zero (though I don't think you would get to zero before death). I think a good reference for this is Peter Emery's review article "...


4

Probably the most comprehensive and practical tool to check for calorie content of foods is USDA Food Composition Database. You can find calorie content for baked chicken, fried chicken, breaded chicken...which is not the same. It also lists the main nutrient composition of every food (carbohydrates, proteins, fats, minerals, vitamins). You can also search ...


3

If you can weigh each part of the meal, then you can look up the calories. There are many apps for this. If you can't weigh it, then a guess can still be made on the approximate portion size. If you're diabetic and need to calculate the carbohydrate load prior to injecting insulin, then you can try asking the chef who should have the nutritional ...


3

Per 100 gram: Sugars = 20 g x 4 kcal = 80 kcal Fiber = 2 g x 2 kcal = 4 kcal Protein = 1 g x 4 kcal = 4 kcal In total: 88 Kcal (368 kJ) and not 10kJ as stated. Carbohydrate total is also wrong. It should be 22 g (not 20 g): 20 g of sugar and 2 g of fiber.


3

You asked for any evidence, and we have this paper, Increased salt consumption induces body water conservation and decreases fluid intake which is interpreted in this newspaper article. Essentially, a higher salt intake does not induce a corresponding increase in free water intake. But renal excretion of water still continues at a rate higher than that ...


3

If a person's body is in a low-metabolism state induced by starvation or restricted calorie intake, then an increase in the calorie intake will allow a raised metabolism. The natural lower limit to metabolism is death: if a person restricts calories too much, their metabolism drops lower and lower, until they develop various complications and then die. The ...


3

Note: This explanation does not concern itself with body health, wellbeing, the ability to follow/sustain the diet short/long term, impact to nervous system or the psychological impact of satiety that low-carb diets can offer. It only concerns itself with the imaginary scenario of two identical subjects following the same total calorie diet but with macro-...


2

The reason why some people say this is because consuming carbs causes insulin levels to rise and insulin inhibits fat metabolism. In the opposite case when type 1 diabetic patients don't take insulin (e.g. when they are ill and not eating well), they are at risk of diabetic ketoacidosis. This is caused by the fat metabolism going in overdrive due to lack of ...


2

Scientists still aren't sure, but it seems carbohydrates may be easily converted into fat, depending on the form, or promote fat storage through stimulating insulin. Nutrition Science and Applications (2nd E) by Smolin and Grosvenor, in Chapter 4, page 140 covers this question well. Carbohydrates in and of themselves are not “fattening.” They provide 4 ...


2

Carbs are not necessarily fattening as many studies comparing low carb diets to one recommended by the FDA with a higher calorie content going to carbs, have found negligible differences in fat loss. Of course, there is another side to the story. The synthesis of adipose tissue is regulated by the level of sugar in the blood, or rather the level of insulin....


2

You drew the right conclusion! Fat does embody more calories (about 9 kcal/g) than the same weight of carbohydrate (4 kcal/g), protein (4 kcal/g) or ethanol (7 kcal/g). These are only approximate values, though, but they have been in use since the late 19th century and the work of Wilbur Olin Atwater. For references and details see the FAO website or this ...


2

You might as well ignore the calories of food given to you in such a situation: Burns Calories: People burn approximately 650 calories per donation of one pint of blood, according to the University of California, San Diego. A donor who regularly donates blood can lose a significant amount of weight, but it should not be thought of as a weight loss plan ...


2

In summary, intermittent fasting could help decrease appetite and thus make weight loss easier for some people, but there is no convincing evidence that it would stimulate catabolism more than other methods of weight loss. If you're fasting for 16 hours, eat 100 calories, then fast 16 more, how significantly different is that from fasting 32 hours? If ...


2

The amount of calories someone consumes is just one side of the coin - you have to consider how many of those calories they are actually expending. The most visible element of that is the amount of activity the person is doing - exercise for example. Imagine two otherwise identical people (Alex and Bob) who have both consumed say 2000 calories. Alex spends ...


2

There are various processes that influence weight gain based on calorie intake. It is in general clear that a severe reduction in calories (well below your body's basal needs) reduces weight in the longer term. I'm not sure any other scenario has consequences that are the same for all people. An important factor is actual intake. Based on your genetics, ...


2

A calorie is a measure of heat given off by burning a substance. This article shows the origin of the term in the context of nutrition https://academic.oup.com/jn/article/136/12/2957/4663943 One of the earlier uses of the term in a physiological metabolic context, as apposed to a physics context, was in a paper by a German scientist named J. R. Mayer. The ...


1

I am satisfied that the calorie content of soda has been fairly constant over the past few decades. A 1992 newspaper article says "a 12-ounce can of 7-Up, Sprite or Coca-Cola contains 150 calories". I conclude that comparisons claiming more calories in milk than soda (ounce for ounce) were, and are, applicable to milk containing fat rather than skim milk.


1

To get the answers started, though admittedly with a very rough estimation, I'll add my own idea of a lower bound of calories burned to regrow an entire liver. Because basic laws of thermodynamics state that to produce 100 calories worth of food requires at the very least 100 calories worth of energy, an estimate on the nutritional content of the liver ...


1

[I]s weight gain a one variable function of calorie intake minus calorie consumption? Yes. It stands to reason because why else is the recommended daily calorie intake always talked about in nutritional information labels? Note, however, that as stipulated in the NHS link, These values can vary depending on age, metabolism and levels of physical ...


1

It is extremely difficult to measure TDEE (Total Daily Energy Expenditure) - the calories one's body uses in a day - because of how complex the body works, how many factors effect it, and how different each person is. 150 calories/day is a relatively small amount in the grand scheme, and probably will not affect you a ton, especially in the short term. One ...


1

All food has calories; it is just a matter of what one's have the lowest. Celery is high in water and low in calories, as is cabbage. For some more low calorie food ideas check out this website: http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20640804,00.html/view-all


1

EDIT: Question: Why the Daily Amount of food from each group does match up to the weekly recommended amounts? Answer: The daily amount is for calories, which means that for individuals who consume 1,000 Cal per day (every day, so 7,000 Cal per week), Guidelines recommend 1/2 cups of dark green vegetables per week. Calories are listed as per day, because ...


1

10 grams protein is way too little. You need about 46-56g of protein per day to feel full. From Harvard.edu: ..."protein helps you stay full for longer"... http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/extra-protein-is-a-decent-dietary-choice-but-dont-overdo-it-201305016145 From WebMD: "Adults in the U.S. are encouraged to get 10% to 35% of their day's calories ...


1

No. Protein isn't just a calorie source. It's an essential macronutrient that participates in a huge range of metabolic processes. The protein-free diet you're proposing is likely to cause protein-energy malnutrition, and possibly other deficiency syndromes never seen before -- I don't think anyone's ever made a serious study of a diet entirely lacking in ...


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