17

There is some very good evidence that replacing a manual toothbrush with an electric toothbrush can help in reducing plaque and the risk of gingivitis. The Cochrane Oral Health Group published a review1 that summarized over 50 studies from 1964-2011. A majority of the studies tested the effects of a rotating oscillating electric toothbrush against a manual ...


16

My short answer is : Brushing your tooth without toothpaste will not cause a greater amount of micro-scratches than if you were to use toothpaste. To begin, tooth paste, is a product most often made of abrasive substances that increases the scrubbing power of the toothbrush bristles. Some kinds of toothpaste can also accomplish other things, such as ...


9

Fluoride can be absorbed into the teeth and form fluoroapatite only in children up to 6-8 years of age (WebMD). Later, fluoride from toothpaste may still be helpful, because it stimulates the incorporation of calcium and phosphorus into the enamel that has been demineralized (PubMed Central, 2006). So, fluoride stimulates remineralization and thus slows ...


6

The NHS says (emphasis mine) Brush your teeth for about 2 minutes last thing at night before you go to bed and on 1 other occasion every day. They don't specifically stipulate as soon as you get up or after breakfast, but brushing in the morning is important because during the night, the formation of plaque is mostly undisturbed. Brushing after each ...


4

The main protective effect of fluoride is outside the tooth, not inside. Small amounts of fluoride in solution around the tooth inhibit demineralization more effectively than incorporated fluoride and have a much greater caries-protective potential than a large proportion of fluorapatite in enamel mineral. Schweiz Monatsschr Zahnmed 122: 1030–...


4

The short answer is NO The long answer is: If time is of concern, ask your oral health professional whether an electric toothbrush can improve your cleaning enough so that 2 minutes of brushing are sufficient. As stated in another question on Health.Stackexchange: it is the physical movement of the bristles of the brush that removes plaque that ...


4

From a medical/dental standpoint, flossing and brushing with or without toothpaste is the best way of eliminating plaque, which can cause cavities and gum disease. For the philosophical aspect of your question: If you had to chose between the two (and you should be doing both!), I would floss, since floss reaches more easily between the teeth than the ...


2

There is no healthy way. Whitening/bleaching do not change the shape of your teeth but alas, dentine doe not bleach well, if at all (it just gets more sensitive to temperature change). Veneers done well will have a 'good' shape to ensure gum health. As for trying to find something to paint on, let's explore that if you place a opaque white dental liquid ...


2

If the bracket is removed all the way and is not cemented you can remove it carefully. You should be fine but I have had this happen before. Just open the tiny latch on the bracket and place bracket in a safe place. If you cannot remove it mouthwash and a little floss or a Christmas tree brush will help clean behind it.


2

There are a few aspects that need to be addressed. 1) Diet & Oral habits: Often, drinks with natural or artificial coloring will stain the surface of the enamel and any tartar (calcified plaque) that rests on your tooth. Some oral products (ex: smoking) and medication (ex: some mouthrinces and some antibiotics) are also known to cause discoloration. ...


1

According to 2 recent systematic reviews, tooth brushing frequency is associated with less dental caries. The studies included were case-control, prospective cohort, retrospective cohort, experimental trials... Tooth brushing frequency and risk of new carious lesions (Evidence Based Dentistry, 2016) Individuals who state that they brush their teeth ...


1

A list of references to research papers on the topic of the possible benefits of brushing teeth can be found at: ADA under 'References'. For example, the first three are: Creeth JE, Gallagher A, Sowinski J, et al. The effect of brushing time and dentifrice on dental plaque removal in vivo. J Dent Hyg 2009;83(3):111-6. Newby EE, Martinez-Mier EA, Zero ...


1

The first question I would ask in response to your question on gum disease is "Have you spoken with your dentist about the health of your gums?" Looking at the NHS webpage on Halitosis, it sounds that most of the possibilities have been ruled out, but not oral hygiene completely. The most common cause of bad breath is poor oral hygiene. Bacteria that ...


1

Can 'vigorous' brushing cause dental problems? Short answer: Yes* (* reviews tend to conclude that it's better to over-brush than under-brush) Longer answer: In addition to the good answer by sergiouribe which lists factors relevant to detrimental tooth brushing, there are a few more things you mentioned which are worth dealing with as implicit questions. ...


1

A detrimental effect of toothbrushing can be influenced by use of an abrasive toothpaste use of hard bristles toothbrush use of excessive force during toothbrush excessive number of toothbrushing per day and any combination of the above A recent review concludes: The benefits of normal oral hygiene procedure exceed possible side effects by far, but ...


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