7

It's not that they can't meet. Meetings can and do happen and there's no medical reason they can't. In fact, most organ procurement programs have a system in place for allowing donors and recipients to meet. An example policy: Does a donor family learn who receives the organs? The identity of both the donor and the recipient are kept anonymous. If ...


5

What was once defined as 'scientific racism' is incompatible with what we know to be science or anthropology. Inter-group differences, supposed to be large in broad terms and used to qualify people, turned out to be much smaller than intra-group differences. And the classifications into 'better' or 'worse' turned out to be completely bogus. But that does not ...


5

In the end, I decided to just ask bone marrow registry foundation, well, one of them, this exact question. The response I got was that if it was allowed for the donor and the patient to meet in person, a strong emotional bond could be established between the two. In case another bone marrow transplant would be needed later, the decision to donate again, or ...


4

You are right that any foreign biological material would normally be attacked by the immune system. That is why people have treatments such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy to erradicate their own bone marrow stem cells and thus suppress their immune function before the transplant. This reduces the risk of the transplant being rejected. From Medline: ...


2

Image source: cancer .gov. Bone marrow is a semi-solid tissue found within the spongy or cancellous (denoting bone tissue with a meshlike structure containing many pores, typical of the interior of mature bones) portions of bones. As you can see in the image above the hematopoiesis occur at the ends of long bones where red bone marrow is present. In red bone ...


2

It's really simple, your misunderstanding just comes from mixing macro- and microanatomy. Macroscopically, all of bone marrow is located inside the bone, in the medullar cavity. Microscopically, bone marrow tissue consists of different cells, some of which are endothelial cells that comprise sinuses, and alongside them (or outside of them, if you will; in ...


2

Not really, not in any long term way. The purpose of bone marrow is (Most often) to provide clean slates (The scientific term being "stem cells") for the production of platelets (Helps with blood clotting), red blood cells (Transports oxygen and carbon dioxide to tissues), and white blood cells (Fights infection). Usually only two to three percent of bone ...


1

I'd like to preface with a brief summary of both techniques: Bone marrow donation - The stem cells are removed from a large bone of the donor, typically the pelvis, through a large needle that reaches the center of the bone. Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation - The stem cells may come from the blood of the patient or a donor. A peripheral blood stem ...


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