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I would not call it hemophilia, but viral hemorrhagic fevers involve coagulopathy (quote from Wikipedia): small blood clots form in blood vessels throughout the body, removing platelets necessary for clotting from the bloodstream and reducing clotting ability. DIC is thought to cause bleeding in Rift Valley, Marburg, and Ebola fevers. Ebola would be the ...


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According to the Stanford Blood Center and the American Society for Apharesis, you should increase your intake of fluids, calcium, and iron at least two days before your platelet donation appointment – this will help prevent negative donation reactions.


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TL;DR: You can use any fingers you want except the thumbs. You can see the reason for that in the diagram below. Notice that there are two arteries supplying each finger that run down both sides of the finger, but there is a single artery supplying the thumb that runs down the middle of it. That means you can't feel the pulse in your fingers when you press ...


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According to Minnesota Dept. of Health: A normal level of oxygen is usually at least 95% or higher. Some people with chronic lung disease or sleep apnea can have normal levels of around 90%. The SpO2 reading on a pulse oximeter shows the percentage of oxygen in someone’s blood. The instructions that came with my home-use pulse oximeter (in German) roughly ...


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This isn't an exhaustive list, but a non-sterile puncture is a risk of tetanus (infection with Clostridium tetani): The spores can get into the body through broken skin, usually through injuries from contaminated objects. Tetanus bacteria are more likely to infect certain breaks in the skin. These include: Wounds contaminated with dirt, poop (feces), or ...


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As far as I know, the only blood thinner that is known for its potential to reduce platelet count is Heparine. See e.g. Wikipedia, HIT - heparin induced thrombocytopenia, www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heparin-induced_thrombocytopenia "If someone receiving heparin develops new or worsening thrombosis, or if the platelet count falls, HIT can be confirmed ...


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As you correctly mentioned, Korotkoff sounds are caused by a turbulent flow wave, going through the artery - which, by definition, occurs when the heart muscle contracts. So yes, what you hear is the same as what you would feel when taking a pulse. *Additional note: in some cases peripheral pulse might not represent the exact heart beat (see pulse deficit)


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As pointed out in mytutor.co.uk in the basic biology section When we breathe we inhale oxygen from the air into our lungs. The alveoli are tiny air sacs in the lung where oxygen diffuses into the blood via small blood vessels, known as capillaries. The blood in these capillaries has a low concentration of oxygen which allows oxygen in the alveoli to diffuse ...


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