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29

Great question! I think it's answerable as an overview, but please know this is only the tip of the iceberg.* Summary: Yes, we have deficits of certain blood products in certain locations at certain times that affect patient care. However, a small percentage of blood product does expire unused (because it wasn't the right product [see background] in the ...


14

The World Health Organization published a report entitled Blood Donor Selection: Guidelines on Assessing Donor Suitability for Blood Donation. Based on a review of scientific studies and other literature, it contains detailed recommendations for establishing blood donation programs, including which donors to accept or reject. It mentions several autoimmune ...


10

I think your skepticism may come from not understanding the process behind the claim. A single unit of blood is separated into 4 main "blood products": red blood cells, plasma, platelets, and white blood cells. Another product called cryoprecipitate can be produced from frozen then thawed plasma and is used in special circumstances. Whole blood is rarely ...


10

These are not really synonymous. Despite some sites claiming them to be. Compare the usage on this site. Lipaemia is describing lab artifacts, that is roughly too much fat in the blood sample that interferes with other tests and measurements. Hyperlipidemia is what is wanted to get measured in a blood sample, that is lipo-proteins or roughly: cholesterol. ...


9

Clostridium tetani is the causative organism in tetanus. It requires an anaerobic environment to grow so is found in soil and in the gut of animals. Person to person transmission is not possible. Vaccination state is irrelevant for both parties. http://www.cdc.gov/tetanus/about/index.html


9

Initially surgeons did wear white in the operating theater, but there were two large problems with this. Firstly, under the bright lights, the white reflects too much light making an inordinate amount of glare making it difficult to see. Secondly, the white cloth highlighted the red blood which many people found objectionable. As a result, most operating ...


9

Because the context refers to a serum sample, and it sounds like a low quality one, you should use lipemia (or, the british variant lipaemia), not hyperlipidemia. See here for an example of the context where this is used. Hemolysis, icterus, and lipemia (HIL) in patient specimens may interfere with the accurate measurement of various analytes


8

Eating chalk is a type of Pica. It is characterized by an appetite for substances that are largely non-nutritive, such as paper, clay, drywall or paint, metal, chalk, soil, glass, or sand which is more common with women and children. Low blood-hemoglobin levels, a sign of anemia, are common, because the ingestion of chalk inhibits absorption of iron from ...


8

This is a very good question. The answer: because your head was meant to be above your body! Your body has very specific mechanisms for maintaining a constant blood flow in the cerebral circulation despite shifts in blood pressure, either due to changing blood pressure in the rest of the circulation or due to a different 'local' pressure because of position ...


8

There is evidence that a muscular arm will produce a higher systolic reading if the wrong sized cuff is applied. There are two measurements in a blood pressure reading, the systolic and the diastolic. The systolic blood pressure (SBP) is the first number in a reading (Such as the 120 in 120/60), and the diastolic blood pressure (DBP) is the second number. ...


8

Calculating from the numbers Wikipedia's articles on bone marrow and red blood cells, the bone marrow in an adult human produces between 200 billion and 500 billion red blood cells a day, taking between 60 and 120 days to produce enough to replace the 20-30 trillion red blood cells in circulation. Under normal conditions, red blood cells wear out and are ...


8

Menstrual blood is composed of a mixture of blood (blood cells), vaginal secretions, endometrial cells and inflammatory cells. I have found no study investigating the change in colour of mentruation blood . However, the presence of endometrial cells (mucosa lining of the uterus) and necrotic cells (from the endometrium) is supposed to be highest during the ...


7

Yes, it is possible. In a bone marrow transplant, all of the patient's bone marrow is destroyed and replaced with donor marrow. Since red blood cells are created by bone marrow, the donor's blood type will determine which type of red cells are produced, as explained here: Does my blood type change after SCT or BMT? Yes. The recipients blood type ...


7

Direct blood transfusion is both dangerous for the donor and inconvenient in a modern medical setting, so this does not really happen today outside of movies/TV. Before blood banking and anticoagulation, direct blood transfusion was done between the artery of a donor and vein of a recipient; pressure is much higher in the arteries than the veins. See Crile, ...


6

I could not find a report where this has been formally studied but it is highly likely that persons coming to plains after staying at high altitude will feel more energetic, for a few days at least. This is even used by many sports organizations. Quoting from "Human Biological Adaptability: Adapting to High Altitude": On returning to sea level after ...


6

Levels generally increase until the ages of 50-60, then fall. In children, levels of LDL and HDL generally either rise or fall monotonically (i.e. continuously) over childhood; see Dai et al. (2009). LDL-C was found to decrease in both genders, while HDL-C was found to increase in girls and fluctuate in boys. The NIH says of adults Blood cholesterol ...


6

There are a few different types of injury to the skin. You can have a contusion (Bruise), abrasion (scrape), puncture, laceration or incision. The injury that you suffered is a laceration, as opposed to an incision. The main difference between the two is the cleanliness of the edges, lacerations are more jagged, incisions are clean slices. There's a few ...


6

First problem: Blood is an organic substance, and like all organic substances that aren't cooked, refrigerated or otherwise preserved, it will rot. You'll need to freeze or at least refrigerate it. Second problem: It is a biohazard. Any diseases the donor had (known or unknown) will potentially be in that blood at infectious levels. Any bacteria introduced ...


6

CRP C-reactive protein (CRP) is produced by the liver. The level of CRP rises when there is inflammation throughout the body. It is one of a group of proteins called "acute phase reactants" that go up in response to inflammation. So, when there is an inflammation anywhere in your body, the amount of C-reactive protein in your blood will rise. The CRP ...


6

Screening tests such as "blood tests and imaging" have two costs and one benefit: the cost (dollars and possible health problems) of the actual screening, which can in some cases be free the cost (dollars and possible health problems) of the followups required when the screening is positive the benefit of less people dying or their treatment being less ...


6

Great answer above. This is to add on to it: Making a decision on whether to recommend screening tests for the entire population is different from deciding whether to screen an individual patient. The USPSTF uses panels of experts who employ extensive epidemiology and biostatistics and literature reviews to make those recommendations. At the population ...


5

Aneurysm - a pathologic ballooning of a segment of a blood vessel Source: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/arm/types - Public Domain In order for an aneurysm to occur, conditions must be present that cause degradation or abnormal development of the structural components of the blood vessel wall. We can list out common causes into those ...


5

I'm not aware of any work done in this area. A whole blood transfusion is not going replace circulating defective lymphocytes. On the other hand Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation has some promise in patients with deteriorating lung function. Autologous HSCT could “reset” the host immune system to a point in time when the antigenic triggers of ...


5

I don't know if anyone can give a definite answer as to why these folks so badly wanted you to donate platelets over whole blood, but there are many possible reasons. Platelets give you more bang for your buck. According to the American Red Cross, one session of platelet apheresis can collect enough platelets for one or two transfusions. On the other hand, ...


5

Smoking and drinking both put the recipient of the blood donation at risk or possible risk. Smoking causes nicotine to enter your bloodstream and usually breaks down into cotinine. Both of these are connected with increasing plasma Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) levels, which may be involved in the progression of both vascular disease and cancer. ...


5

Somehow today I had a bit more luck in addressing my own question. It seems that many of the online blood testing services do offer tests on a disaggregated basis. Their more popular products are bundled tests that include some of the typical overall blood tests for an annual physical. But, several of those enterprises also offer unbundled tests of more ...


5

If that is the accurate pressure, you really need to go to the emergency room! 188 is high but not immediately dangerous, but 134 for a diastolic is outrageous. At very least go to an urgent care or a pharmacy and have it double checked. To answer the original question, blood pressure and pulse are not directly related. The body regulates both separately ...


5

Yes. what you are describing sounds like microscopic hematuria (1). Sometimes red blood cells(RBC) are not numerous enough to be visible in urine. Yet, when tested, RBCs are detected. (1) http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMcp012694


5

"Luckily" haemophilia only occurs in men*; women may be carrier of the disease but their bleeding tendency is in general less severe. However, haemophilia carriers and women with other bleeding disorders (such as von Willebrand disease or platelet problems, e.g. Glanzmann) may experience very heavy menstrual blood loss. In general the menstruation won't ...


5

They’re fastened together by blood vessels, nerves and most importantly, connective tissue, muscles and bones. Image Source: anatomyorgan.com Image Source: Britannica The same holds true for other organs in the body, although the skin and the brain are slightly different cases. The brain does float around, albeit in the cerebrospinal fluid, and very ...


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