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What happens when a blood vessel is cut during surgery? Blood vessels (not just veins, but arteries also) are transected (cut), ligated (tied off), and/or cauterized (burned closed) in just about every surgical procedure ever. When done appropriately, this does not cause a problem because there is more than one path from the heart to the tissue and more ...


4

After internal bleeding, the blood serum from the blood can be reabsorbed back into the circulation (capillaries), and the blood cells can be phagocytosed by macrophages. The blood serum from the abdominal cavity can be resorbed by the peritoneal blood vessels and from the pleural space by the pleural lymphatic vessels. Some hematomas may not be ...


3

Map of the superficial arteries (the arteries close beneath the skin), taken from ClinicalGate, which I believe they have taken from Gray's Anatomy for Students Map of the deeper arteries, ibid I'm unsure which you consider the left-mid side of your forehead, but you probably felt one of the larger arteries like the superficial temporal artery or the ...


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Yes, this can basically be accomplished via plastination, whereby they replace the normal water in tissue with a form of silicone. You can use it on virtually any kind of tissue; first time I walked into an anatomy lab I grabbed a large slice of something... about 1-inch thick, with a large hole in its center and began wondering what it was. Only when I ...


2

Increased vascular permeability means fluid leaks more readily from blood vessels. That leakage builds up in the surrounding tissue, which causes edema. The edema squeezes veins, thereby compressing them, which means they can't do their job of draining the tissue efficiently, and that can lead to the vicious circle he mentions. Vasodilation means the ...


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