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One of the greatest benefits of MRI scans is their safety. Unlike PET, X-ray, CT and most other scans, MRIs use the properties of body tissues in magnetic fields to produce an image. The MRI machine produces a powerful magnetic field which interacts with body tissues to produce radio waves, which are in turn interpreted by a computer to determine the ...


34

The IARC has concluded that cell phones are a "possible carcinogen" due to the amount of evidence going both directions. The gist of it is summarised on the website itself: Cell phones emit radiofrequency energy, a form of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation, which can be absorbed by tissues closest to where the phone is held. The amount of ...


30

TL;DR: No, food cooked via a microwave oven is generally not less healthy than food cooked by other methods. In general, cooking by any method destroys or reduces nutrient value1,4. This is due to a number of factors: Solubility. Water-soluble nutrients (like Vitamin B, C) are highly prone to leach out if cooking in water2 (boiling, for example). Fat-...


16

Heat in a microwave oven is generated by the rotation of water molecules by bombarding them with electromagnetic radiation in the microwave spectrum (non-ionizing electromagnetic waves between common radio waves and infrared frequencies) causing polarized molecules in the food to rotate or collide and subsequently thermal energy is built up (dielectric ...


12

Every procedure has to be weighed for potential costs and benefits. Cancer is a risk already present and might shorten a life, CT scans on the other hand are done to prolong a life. The exact risks (costs) for CT scans is unknown, especially the exact risks for you, since we only have statistical data to estimate that. Prior data forms the basis for this ...


11

Exposure to ionizing radiation, such as from x-rays, is known to increase the risk of cancer. However, although many studies have examined the potential health effects of non-ionizing radiation from radar, microwave ovens, cell phones, and other sources, there is currently no consistent evidence that non-ionizing radiation increases cancer risk (1). Source: ...


6

According to the FCC depending on the frequency, a few Watts per kg absorbed RF radiation is an appropriate safety limit. Since 20 dBm corresponds to a total emitted power of 0.1 Watt, there is nothing to worry about.


6

CT brain at 31, what's the risk? Short answer: Very little, compared to overall cancer risk* Longer answer: Your girlfriend is concerned about increased risk of brain malignancy due to having a CT at age 31. This is something that the FDA has weighed in on in a helpful summary page: As in many aspects of medicine, there are both benefits and risks ...


4

The amounts of radiation in today's machines is low enough that there is no negative impact to be expected. For comparison: X-Rays: A chest X-ray gives you about 10 mrem MRIs measure the reaction time of molecules (in the body) to changes of outside magnetic fields. No radiation or radioactivity is involved at all. CT-Scans: A chest CT scan clocks in at ...


2

Many countries have done studies that seem to indicate short-term exposure to the radiation does not increase risk of cancer. (German) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16443797 (Danish) http://jnci.oxfordjournals.org/content/98/23/1707.abstract (Swedish) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15746469 (US) http://www.cancer.gov/newscenter/newsfromnci/2012/...


2

The TL;DR answer is: yes, radiation can cause cancer, but no one knows for sure exactly what the risk is of one CT scan. Radiation (especially in fetuses/children) increases the likelihood of cancer. Our information comes mostly from atomic bomb survivors, people exposed at Chernobyl, people treated with high doses of radiation for cancer and other ...


1

As @Carey says in his comment, measuring pain is very subjective to the individual, and their reporting of pain levels. It doesn't have any way of scientific measurement. Wikipedia has a list of 'pain scales'. ElectroMagnetic Radiation has some thresholds at which things happen, such as: Sufficiently strong electromagnetic radiation (EMR) can cause ...


1

No, they aren’t. In the area of biological effects and medical applications of non-ionizing radiation approximately 25,000 articles have been published over the past 30 years. Despite the feeling of some people that more research needs to be done, scientific knowledge in this area is now more extensive than for most chemicals. Based on a recent in-depth ...


1

The risk from a single CT exposure should realistically be estimated to be zero. The commonly used "linear no-threshold extrapolation model" to get to estimates of cancer risks due to exposure to low levels of radiation (of the order of 10 mSv or less) has no scientific basis whatsoever. E.g., observations of excess cancer cases after the Chernobyl ...


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