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I think there's a link, but no one can say that this is the cause of myopia According to American Optometric Association : The exact cause of nearsightedness is unknown, but two factors may be primarily responsible for its development: Heredity and Visual Stress Even though the tendency to develop nearsightedness may be inherited, its actual ...


6

YES, according to: The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) of the United States and National Heath Service (NHS) of the United Kingdom. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is a clinically approved method to treat depression, without the usage of medication. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a common and well-studied form of psychotherapy, ...


5

Basically you're asking how to overcome a compulsion you feel about your mouth hygiene. That is no small feat, especially since you're already aware of the problems associated with over-brushing. In general, obsessive thoughts/compulsive behaviors are differentiated from simple worries by, among other things, being more frequent, distressing, associated ...


4

I think the best known environmental risk factor (to date) for myopia is lack of intense/outdoor light exposure. The pathway for this is reasonably well understood, namely: lack of intense light exposure leads to lowered dopamine, which is necessary to prevent eye growth, which in turn leads to myopia. This based on relatively recent evidence, but it is of ...


3

I came across a similar question in Psychology.SE whilst researching CBT for a course I was studying. The short answer As I will cover in the long answer, there has been a lot of articles stating that CBT is very effective, and there are articles which have stated that it is not as effective as has been claimed. CBT is not a single model of therapy, ...


3

The phenomenon you are describing of the pupils dilating when telling a lie has to do with the way the muscles around the eye are wired to the nervous system, and more specifically, the autonomic nervous system. For better understanding, I suggest reading the chapter about neurotransmission in any introductory pharmacology book, such as Katzung's Basic and ...


2

First: it says on the WebMD link you posted that you should consult your doctor immediately if you experience the side effect of "outbursts of words/sounds." Please be sure you do so. The word for the involuntary behaviors you're experiencing is tics. They are "verbal tics" if you are saying words, or "vocal tics" if you are making non-word sounds with your ...


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