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When you browse through Pubmed, there are two articles which provide some insights for your question: Shah U, Mandl L, Mertelsmann-Voss C, et al. Systemic lupus erythematosus is not a risk factor for poor outcomes after total hip and total knee arthroplasty. Lupus. 2015;24(9):900-908. doi:10.1177/0961203314566635. 1 They have done a case-control study ...


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Monoarticular arthritis, or inflammation of a single joint, is a not uncommon complaint. Common causes in an older patient include gout, pseudogout, trauma, and infection. Gonococcal arthritis is a particularly common cause when monoarticular arthritis is seen in a younger patient.


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To answer your question, Yes. You can focus on boosting your metabolism since you can't freely do sport. To answer the person that downvoted my answer, we can see that boosting one's metabolism is a commonly used concept in approved Health SE sources. E.g. based on this article on WebMD: Can you change your metabolism? Yes. Whether you're born with a ...


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"Rheumatism" isn't one disease. It's not even a set of closely related diseases, it's just a name for anything affecting the joints and/or connective tissue. As such, there is a wide range of illnesses and causes for these illnesses. What most people mean when they say rheumatism is arthritis, which is yet another word for a wide range of illnesses, though ...


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This long-term study states: Reginster, J. Y., Deroisy, R., Rovati, L. C., Lee, R. L., & al, e. (2001). Long-term effects of glucosamine sulphate on osteoarthritis progression: A randomised, placebo-controlled clinical trial. The Lancet, 357(9252), 251-6. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.tcu.edu/docview/199008719?accountid=7090 There were no differences in ...


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Although the etiology is unknown, we have a bit of an idea of its pathophysiology Etiology of RA is unknown. Although the impact of genetic factors is obvious, the genetic basis is not sufficient to explain the triggering of the immune insult. - pubmed - ncbi As you have mentioned, the circadian rhythm of cytokines has something to do with the classical ...


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Odds vary. The most straightforward study I could find was Koumantaki et al. (1997), which found several odds ratios for developing rheumatoid arthritis: 4.4 for individuals having a first degree relative with the disease. 5.4 for individuals having a female first degree relative with the disease. 7.0 for females having a first degree relative with the ...


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On J-Stage, you have extensive lists of foods (by food groups) high in purines (mg/100 g). Such lists can be misleading, because it is not only the amount of purines in the food but also a type of food that can be associated with gout risk. Mayo Clinic: Studies have shown that vegetables high in purines do not increase the risk of gout or recurring ...


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In treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, the following immunosuppressants, which are already in use, inhibit cytokines: Non-biologic DMARDs (Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs): methotrexate, leflunomide, hydroxychloroquine, sulfasalazine, cyclosporine, and tacrolimus Biologic DMARDs: adalimubab, anakinra, certolizumab, etanercept, golimubab, infliximab, ...


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Women are actually treated with hormones, just ones that aren't estrogen/progesterone/ect.. People with severe RA are treated with glucocorticoids in order to decrease T and B cell proliferation that further damage to the synovial joints. These hormones have long term health impacts (such as Cushing's disease) and should be used as a last ditch effort. ...


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