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The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association (APA), also known as the DSM, is the guide for any psychological disorders, and the DSM-5 which is the current version (APA, 2013) describes Social Anxiety Disorder as follows: A. A persistent fear of one or more social or performance situations in which the person is exposed to ...


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As going through your question, you show your inner feelings. So it is better you to go with "Psychologist". Psychiatrist is a medical doctor, he or she has the knowledge and training to evaluate underlying medical problems or drug effects that could cause emotional or behavioral symptoms. Whereas Psychologist deals with mental health. Psychologists ...


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It is not a fast heart rate but the underlying mechanisms that can affect health. The mechanisms involved in exercise can be beneficial and those in anxiety harmful. EXERCISE Physiological responses and long-term adaptations to exercise (CDC.gov): ...the cardiovascular response to exercise is directly proportional to the skeletal muscle oxygen demands ...


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Behavioral therapy works well. Behavioral therapists initially focus on teaching what anxiety is, helping the client to identify anxiety responses, teaching relaxation techniques, setting goals, discussing methods to achieve those goals, and helping the client to visualize phobic situations. One behavioral therapy often used to treat phobias is ...


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One’s mental state has a major effect on bowel function. In fact, there is a high correlation between IBS and stress. Given the high levels of anxiety and stress commonly seen in patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome, evidence suggests that the syndrome may be linked to a disruption of the stress system. The stress response in the body involves the ...


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A psychologist could help her, e.g. using Cognitive behavioral therapy. It's likely that whenever she feels that something doesn't feel quite right and the idea that this could be cancer crosses her mind, she doesn't have enough knowledge to dismiss such thoughts on their merit. If she is taught about this, then she can start to suppress such thoughts. But ...


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Welcome to Health SE! Astrophobia I did a Google search for [ fear of space ] and looked at what appeared. I think that your phobia is called "astrophobia". See, for example, this Wiktionary definition. Causes You can try a Google search, and look at some of the results, to learn why phobias develop. Treatment Like all phobias, and like all other ...


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In general, anxiety can be handled with medications or with "talking therapy", of which there are many types. So far you have seen two doctors. One offered medication. You were concerned about depending on them rather than learning to handle situations yourself, and about possible side effects or damage to yourself from those pills. These are wonderful ...


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Usually on health SE the question about specific steps and/or medication to help you would be closed as personal medical advice question, and you would be prompted to ask a medical professional's help. But, since you have given a detailed explanation why you don't think it would work for you, I hope this answer will help you and other who have a similar ...


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I have suffered from health anxiety for the last couple of years and let me share some of the things I find helpful. Stay hydrated: Drinking loads of water instantly relieves the tightness in your throat and definitely helps alleviate anxiety. If you think you're about to have a panic attack start drinking till your stomach is full and think about the ...


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Person with social anxiety here. I want to share some personal experience with you. Most of the symptoms you described (both mental and physical) are familiar to my own. Get help First, I totally agree with Lucky. Seeing a therapist/psychologist is in my honest opinion the best thing to do. This person can help in the form of giving exercises, advice or ...


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Tell her to breath deep every day for atleast 5 to 10 minutes she can start by doing for 2 minutes it will calm her down and she would worry less as her mind would relax . You can make a comfortable and loving environment for her so that she always know that you are there whatever happens . These easy things can be done at home . It would be hard to be ...


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Breathing into a paper bag to control hyperventilation might improve hypocarbia, but should NOT be done because of the risks of hypoxia and death. This case report shows that breathing into a paper bag during hyperventilation can reduce partial pressure of oxygen by up to 42 mmHg (normal 80-100mmHg) and can result in death. As answered by @arkiaamu, a better ...


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I did not find any studies which would investigate that matter. Moreover, in 2008 Nillni and co-workers (1) stated: Surprisingly, although the expressed goal of breathing training is to correct hyperventilation, pCO2 has never been used as an outcome measure In a recent study (2) it was concluded: Clinical improvement must have depended on elements ...


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As other people have indicated, what you're describing is definitely a mental illness. In the DSM-IV this was called hypochondriasis and is also sometimes called health anxiety. Technically it's now split into two separate conditions as of the adoption of the DSM-V but it's still worthwhile to look at the diagnostic criteria from the DSM-IV: A. ...


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She has something called hypochondria which is the same disease I suffer from. Hypochondria means excessive health anxiety. Let me tell you some key points. If she is worried too much she'll start producing REAL SYMPTOMS in her body. I was worried about a spot in my mouth for 2 years and had misdiagnosed it as leukoplakia using google. As a result I ...


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Stress and excitement both activate the sympathetic nervous system, so they can feel very physically similar (high heart rates, etc.) The main difference is in higher-level brain processing, where stress is subjectively perceived as negative and excitement as positive. Interestingly, there is a study that proposes "anxiety reappraisal" in which you tell ...


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Neuroscience is complex; this is a simplification. To summarize: yes, breathing techniques and other meditation and biofeedback methods have been shown to be effective for reducing anxiety and panic, as has been cognitive behavioral therapy. Psychotherapy is a critical part of treatment of anxiety disorders. Some people benefit from medications like SSRIs ...


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Stress- relief techniques can help manage anxiety... specific ones to incorporate based on anxiety are... Mindful meditation as shown by the study in this article... http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/abs/10.1176/ajp.149.7.936 Meditation can be performed in the morning before the toddlers awake, or after they go to bed. Even 5 minutes consistently done ...


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If a doctor mentioned eating a healthier diet in relation to your problems then that suggests that your diet is pretty bad. We can't judge if that's the case, but if you are not eating well, e.g. lack of proteins in your diet, not enough calories etc., then that will affect your psychological well being. Your brain will hit the stress and anxiety button a ...


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Are there studies on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)? Of course, and the studies are numerous. If conducted in non-Chinese contexts the results are most of the time quite underwhelming or more reason for concern than anything like "encouraging". Way too often the theory behind the treatments appears flaky, the evidence for effectiveness regarding desired ...


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I recommend seeing a counselor/therapist/psychologist ASAP to help you with this. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is one of many approaches to anxiety. But a professional can help identify what you need to focus on. They are the branch of healthcare that manages mental health with behavioral interventions rather than medications (or in addition to medications ...


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