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TeachMeAnatomy Containing over 700 vibrant, full-colour images, TeachMeAnatomy is a comprehensive anatomy encyclopedia presented in a visually-appealing, easy-to-read format. Created by a team of doctors and medical students, each topic combines anatomical knowledge with high-yield clinical pearls, seamlessly bridging the gap between scholarly learning and ...


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Does the uterus return to its original (pre-pregnancy) size after a full term birth? Good question. No. Uterine involution, the return of the uterus to the nonpregnant state postpartum, does involve a remarkable decrease in size, but it's not as small as it was before pregnancy. Nonpregnant uterine size increases with what we call parity, or the number of ...


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When a physician is studying someone for a suspected disorder related to the thyroid hormones, he/she should not only study the thyroid, but evaluate the hypothalamus-pituitary-thiroid endocrine axis and a frequent initial assumption is that the problem could be at any of these 3 levels instead of assuming the problem is in the thyroid gland. Thyroid serum ...


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In general in these situations the medial/lateral terminology is used, however in case of hands/feet due to the ability to pronate and supinate this might lead to confusion, therefore specific terms "radial, ulnar" are preferred. ...for clarity, the sides are named after the bones. Structures closer to the radius are radial, structures closer to ...


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One may use anatomical terminology as in if the injury is on that side of a digit which is near to the midline then one may say that the medial side of fourth finger was injured. The other side which is away from midline is the lateral side. More specifically there are other terms eg anterior posterior, to indicate the front or back surface of a hand/finger. ...


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You can use the formula for blood vessel flowrate by accounting heart rate and radius using flow rate formula: Q=ΔP/R Wherein; flow rate (volume/time); ΔP = pressure difference (mm Hg); and R = resistance to flow (mm Hg x time/volume). "This equation may be applied not only to a single vessel, but can also be used to describe flow through a network of ...


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Gray's Anatomy - an old but complete online book with detailed text and pictures. Get Body Smart - by organic systems, at a glance Inner Body - on hover interactive images, with text KenHub - 50 videos AnatomyZone - ~200 videos, including basic terminology


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The part of the ribs that articulates with the thoracic vertebrae (in your spine) is called the proximal end and the part that articulates with the costal-cartilage / sternum (in the centre of your chest) is called the distal end. The 11th and the 12th pair of ribs only articulates with the thoracic vertebrae (proximal). They are called as floating ribs. ...


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Nerve injury in supracondylar fractures of the humerus Supracondylar fractures of the humerus are the most common type of elbow fracture in children. Both median and ulnar nerve injury can occur with supracondylar fractures. Anatomy A supracondylar fracture is a fracture through the distal humerus, proximal to the condyle. The image above shows an x-...


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Adding to the above answer, the most immediate fatal events are: While you can cut the corpus callosum effectively separating R/L cerebral cortex without killing the person, splitting your midbrain/brainstem is instant game over. Almost all signals to/from the rest of the body and cerebral cortex, including your heartbeat breathing and consciousness, ...


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A person is not a loaf of bread, but a network of organs at various positions that depend upon each other. What you are basically asking, would damage some organs by cutting them in half this rendering them useless, while others you would only cut off the blood supply, which would kill them. TLDR they would bleed out before anything else could happen.


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I think you are referring to thumb hypoplasia. Or more specifically thumb hypoplasia Type II. It restricts the movement of the thumb. It is a congenital disorder. The cause is still unknown, maybe some genetic deformalities. Type II is characterized by a tight web space between the thumb and index finger which restricts movement, poor thenar muscles and ...


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This anatomy site doesn't provide reputable citations, but I don't see any obvious inaccuracies and it has a reasonable section on potential clinical presentations of superficial fibular nerve injuries: There are two relatively common pathologies involving the damage to the superficial fibular nerve; entrapment and direct damage (e.g from a comminuted ...


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Atrophia bulbi (with shrinkage) It occurs with shrinkage and also without shrinkage. In without shrinkage, generally the eye is of normal size, but the globe can be enlarged due to glaucoma. In with shrinkage, the globe becomes soft,small and partially collapsed. Atrophy is present in the intraocular tissues but the relationship between the tissues are ...


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Contralateral (opposite site) is the opposite of ipsilateral (same side) in anatomical terminology. In looking for references for this, I found "counter side" used in place of "contralateral" primarily in surgical literature, but it is not quite as common as contralateral, and ut isn't listed anywhere I could find with a clear definition. Nonetheless I ...


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Free videos with subtitles: Introduction to Anatomy: basic anatomical terms, planes, positions, directions..a single 20 min video Kenhub, comprehensive, organized, with basic anatomical terms, medical imaging, also histology, premium account available with quizzes and study questions Anatomy Zone, also available on YouTube: 190+ videos, maybe not ...


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"Daily patterns" in biology and medicine are referred to as "circadian" - circa means "around" or "approximately", and "dia" refers to "day" - "approximately daily". Yes, as the Mayo Clinic site states, there is a circadian pattern to blood pressure. The primary pattern is that blood pressure (both systolic and diastolic) is higher during the day than at ...


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why would natural selection stop at skin level? The division of humanity into "races" was not natural. Yes, some (e.g. darker skin in sunnier locations) was natural, but for the most part it was the result of human intelligence and racism. Genetic drift caused slight differences between isolated communities, but when those communities came into ...


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I'll update this answer if I find new useful resources. I'm now trying this website: https://human.biodigital.com/view?id=production%2FmaleAdult%2Fmale_region_head_07&lang=fr and it helped me a little bit to understand the laryngopharynx zone. The navigation is 3D (pan / zoom).


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As @Carey says in his comment, measuring pain is very subjective to the individual, and their reporting of pain levels. It doesn't have any way of scientific measurement. Wikipedia has a list of 'pain scales'. ElectroMagnetic Radiation has some thresholds at which things happen, such as: Sufficiently strong electromagnetic radiation (EMR) can cause ...


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The confusion arises from unnecessary use of Latin terms, especially their -ly forms, and the word order. All this can be simply made more clear. Eg 1. The iliopsoas is related anteriorly to the fascia lata and the femoral artery, and posteriorly to the capsule of the hip joint. In the front of the iliopsoas, there are fascia lata and femoral artery, and ...


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No, at least not reliably. Each person is different and some tympanic membranes are situated in a pretty direct angle. Even in canals with a steep angle, a strong enough jet just ricocheting off the wall can still generate enough force to be harmful. Don't use any water jet type of thing that was not designed for ears. Some of the dangers are discussed ...


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