11

This is a really interesting question, because it really isn't as easy as people being a bit more susceptible in the winter. There's no definitive answer yet. Influenza Seasonality: Underlying Causes and Modeling Theories says: In temperate climates, flu infections at whatever level of intensity are characterized by a flu season. In these areas, the ...


7

There is no true allergy to cold, but there is a condition called cold urticaria, which is a subtype of physical urtiaria. Other subtypes of physical urticaria include increased sensitivity to physical pressure, water, heat, sun exposure, etc. Mayo Clinic: Cold Urticaria Cold urticaria is a skin reaction to cold that appears within minutes after cold ...


4

No. Allergy, which is an exaggerated immune sensitivity to certain environmental compounds, usually plants, or less commonly microorganisms, metals and other materials. McConnell, Thomas H. (2007). The Nature of Disease: Pathology for the Health Professions. Baltimore, Mar.: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. p. 159. ISBN 978-0-7817-5317-3. Archived from ...


3

There are just too many factors to give an easy clean answer to this question. To limit the problem, lets assume the individual is wearing 1 CLO of clothing in still dry air. Further, lets assume that this person has a surface area of 2 m (a little bigger than the typical male, but it makes the math easier). Finally, lets assume they can indefinitely produce ...


2

Well, since you already have a well-written answer, I just wanted to add this as another possible cause: Research done by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) in 2008 found that the influenza virus has a butter-like coating. The coating melts when it enters the respiratory tract. In the winter, the coating becomes a hardened ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible