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7

In general any cellular material within the vitreous may cause eye floaters, for example red blood cells as a result of hemorrhage and white blood cells as a result of infection or inflammation. So cause of it should be always determine by a doctor (ophthalmologist). Abnormal eye floaters are associated with bleeding in the vitreous from diabetic retinopathy,...


6

...it seems possible that with aging, as the vitreous becomes less distinct from the aqueous, some of the vitreous might end up draining through the same duct that the aqueous drains through, in an eye with no lens to serve as a barrier. Is that the case? In a normal (i.e. lens intact) eye, that would, I think, be a problem. The aqueous humor is a self-...


4

Maybe. Depends on the 95-year old... and the 25-year old. A heart failure diagnosis isn't just the process of getting older; it has objective criteria. I expect most 95-year olds would score above zero on this scale, many quite highly, but not all of them would. And, of course, we know there are 25-year olds who would score highly too, so I'd say it's a ...


4

Can aging of the heart be equivalent to having (mild) heart failure? Absolutely. A large part of aging is the process of telomeres shortening with each cell division, making our DNA more vulnerable. As more DNA damage accumulates, more cells in the heart (and everywhere else in the body) become dysfunctional - that's essentially what aging is. So while ...


4

As you grow older, your tendons become more rigid and brittle. This is probably because of decrease in the water content of tendons, which is one of the reasons why tendons are flexible. This decrease in water content makes your tendons stiffer and weaker. They also become less tolerable of stress. This causes you to be more prone to tendon injuries, which ...


2

The source does not explicitly tell the long-term story, but I presume that since those particles are actual matter inside your eye (due to the ageing process as your body slowly disseminates), then they would not dissolve with the time, nor leave the eye-ball. Logically, they might stick to the wall of an eye-ball or something similar. Nor is it likely ...


2

Being optimistic is not the only factor but people who were prepared for physical losses, and who were nevertheless optimistic, were better able to maintain better physical functioning, and lower depressive symptoms. in the study below it was concluded that ageing well may depend both on public policy and societal efforts that work against stereotypical ...


1

Well, this is a big question to tackle considering there are so many different strategies that people take. I'll address the question of maintaining 'optimal health to old age' according to the biopsychosocial model of health. 1. Biology - One of the best habits to develop from an early age is to have a healthy diet and exercise regularly. A healthy diet ...


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What you mean by "big people"? Obese? Very tall but not obese (BMI in proper range)? My answer for obese: probably they do age faster, but this is not so easy to prove as we lack measurement tools to measure aging intself. Quote from Obesity accelerates epigenetic aging of human liver (2014): Because obese people are at an increased risk of many age-...


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