7

While it used to be done, in reality anymore it isn't done as it is possible to damage the equipment by rubbing, and the possibility exists of an accidental discharge between paddles which can be dangerous for everyone around. In older times, conductive gel was applied directly to the paddles, and doctors/EMT's would rub the paddles together to distribute ...


3

This is additional information for John's otherwise good answer. Although they're rarely used, it's still common to see paddles on the defibrillators used in EMS at the paramedic level. See those packs on the side of the unit in the photo below? In addition to cables, ECG pads, and defibrillator pads, there are paddles in there along with a tube of ...


2

I doubt your instructor has ever used a defibrillator or even seen one used. That was a huge exaggeration and Wikipedia is right. Shocks from an automated defibrillator are delivered in three levels of power. Depending on the type of defibrillator used, the first shock will typically be 120 or 200 joules (J), the second at 300 or 150 J, and the third at ...


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