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11

It's actually the other way around. Oil coming from your pores causes dead skin cells to clump together, blocking the pore. Acne is a blocked or infected pore. When your skin is oily, the oil actually comes from pores that are not clogged. So the oil you feel when you touch your pimple (which BTW is a bad idea) is probably coming from surrounding pores . ...


8

While I cannot comment on the issue of laying on your back causing acne, I hope my answer helps with your concern for prevention. There is some evidence that glycemic index (GI) is related to more severe acne. One study examining the diets of 287 people from ages 18-25 with no, mild or severe acne, found that those with worse acne had greater dietary (...


6

Robin got it right, any extra oil, grease, dirt, or other foreign matter will aggravate pimples. I had a moderate acne problem through most of my teenage years, and here are some things I learned: Keep affected areas, especially face, as clean as possible. Do this by: a. scrubbing them well with soap daily; and b. thoroughly cleansing with rubbing alcohol ...


6

You are right that there are conflicting viewpoints about whether or not Vaseline and other types of petroleum jelly, also known as petrolatum, are comedogenic (can cause or worsen acne). There are medical professionals who will say that petroleum jelly will cause acne, while others might argue the opposite. The same also goes for research, though most ...


5

This is the anatomy of a hair follicle You can see that there is no muscle to control the size of the pore where the hair exits the skin, so there is no way that the body can control normally the size. The primary problem is not with the Propionibacterium acnes but with excessive oil production which then causes a blockage in conjunction with dead skin ...


5

If the main thrust of the question is indeed expressed in the title and tags of the question: Q “There is a very strong correlation between consuming dairy products — such as milk — and acne, skin breakouts and aging.” Then the jury on that really isn't finished deciding: Is acne related to the ingestion of dairy products? It is not a new idea. It ...


5

These are biologically plausible effects supported by moderate quality observational evidence. As a personal aside, I do not believe there is enough evidence for harm to recommend eliminating dairy products from a healthy person's diet. A full discussion of all the evidence for the impact of dairy in diet is beyond the scope of this answer, though, so lets ...


3

Isotretinoin works by reducing the production of the skin's natural oil (sebum) - Netdoctor UK. The half life of isotretinoin is 10-22 hours (Mortazavis et al., 2014), so it would take about a 5 days to week for the drug to reach steady state. In the meantime as the sebum production reduces, the skin dryness will stimulate the sebum glands to increase ...


3

It is absolutely possible for moisturizer to make acne worse. You've probably heard the term "non-comedogenic" in advertisements for various skin products, and that means that the product is not supposed to cause zits, aka comedones. Here is a page with a more detailed explanation and a handy chart of common ingredients for reference. Additionally, www....


3

According studies, it's an interaction between genetics and environment. If you parents had acne, you might have. But, overall, diet and stress are big factors for acne : your genetic makes you more sensible to this. NCBI : Acne and food I don't understand if you talk about medical treatments or other... I will talk about medical treatments so. 2 classes of ...


3

This is a very interesting, yet tricky, question. The reason you must stop taking the minocycline is because of the interaction between tetracyclines (minocycline) and vitamin A (Retinoic acid) derivatives (isotretinoin/Accutane) causes a pseudotumor cerebri also known as increased intracranial pressure, which can be deadly. Now when taking spironolactone ...


3

Currently, the only real way to "get rid of acne once and for all" is through the use of the prescription medication isotretinoin. It works to reduce sebum production and thusly decreases the incidence of new spots. Warning: It's a serious medication with serious side effects -- for me most notably it was severely dry skin on every inch of my body. I've ...


2

Yes. It is used as a gel. WebMd.com Aloe seems to be able to speed wound healing by improving blood circulation through the area and preventing cell death around a wound. It also appears that aloe gel has properties that are harmful to certain types of bacteria and fungi. Aloe - ncbi.nlh.nih.gov: anti-inflammatory skin soothing Aloe Vera ...


2

With out a little more information, I'm not sure I can provide a meaningful answer. In response to comments, I thought I would make it clear that both products are likely the same (double distilled witch hazel). You should continue using the new bottle as before, assuming you were properly using it in the first place. I doubt there are any truly 100% ...


2

According to this study 1 those of us with oily skin may have less forehead wrinkles.


2

When someone is considering to take 2 drugs both of which can have severe side effects, he/she should discuss this with a doctor, so this part of the question CANNOT be properly answered here. Mirena can actually cause acne: 1. Mirena side effects (Drugs.com) The most commonly reported adverse effects are alterations of menstrual bleeding patterns, nausea, ...


2

Why do you disbelieve the instructions? However, with erythromycin, clindamycin, and tetracyclines, the rate of resistance is associated with point mutations in rRNA (Ross et al., 2001). Mutations in the 23SrRNA component of an E. coli equivalent nucleotide bases give varying degrees of resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin.  So, given prolonged ...


2

I think you're asking if multiple courses will exceed the maximally recommended cumulative dose of 120-150 mg/kg though that is not steadfast as your reference also says One recent study of 116 patients found that a cumulative dose of 220 mg/kg or more may result in lower relapse rates, but confirmation will require study in larger populations.278 ...


2

Most FDA approved agents speak to acne vulgaris, in general, on their approved labelled indications. Nodular severe acne may not be a specifically approved indication but would be included under more general labeling for acne. Light and laser therapies administered by clinical professionals have also been developed and approved. Retinoids, antibiotics ...


2

First of all, according to D. Tan, that 'antibiotics never completely eradicate a bacterial population' is correct. Here are some proof- Any bacterial species has a characteristic level of susceptibility to any given antimicrobial, which has been dubbed “intrinsic resistance."This means that, for any given concentration of antibiotic, a part of the ...


1

Oral antibiotics (traditionally tetracyclines) have been found effective for treating acne for many years. Two major mechanisms inlcude: inhibiting the growth of C. acnes anti-inflammatory effect (inhibits granuloma formation) Of course, antibiotic resistance is a major concern, which is why oral antibiotics are generally prescribed for shortest duration ...


1

To clarify the block quotes you posted, muscle soreness is a rare negative side effect of isotretinoin. It is believed that the effects of isotretinoin depend on the cumulative dose you have received (so, a high dose for a shorter period of time would be similar to a low dose for a longer period of time). The first block quote you are asking about is saying ...


1

Cystic acne are often called "severe acne." Treatment of cystic acne usually involves prescribed drugs, so it's a doctor (a dermatologist) who prescribes them. These drugs can have serious side effects, so it's important to consider all the precautions. According to American Academy of Dermatology: Antibiotic + medicine you apply to the acne: This is ...


1

Your assumption is incorrect; the body doesn't have that kind of feedback mechanism for sebaceous glands. Feedback mechanisms exist in the body for many processes, but this is not one of them. Excessive oil secretion is common, and it is not clear why some people have it and others do not. Sometimes acne results, but not always. References: https://www....


1

The short answer: many therapies can reduce acne scars, but no therapy can get rid of acne scars entirely, so you should talk to a dermatologist about the best option for you. The long answer: Preventing acne scars in the first place is the best approach, but there are many methods for removing scars of different types. There are different kinds of acne ...


1

Your doctor is probably right about it being a hormonal imbalance, but why do you have a hormonal imbalance? That would be a great question for you to ask your doctor. Hormonal imbalances can be caused because of a food sensitivity. Dairy, wheat and soy are the big ones, but it may be one, two, or all three of them. Or it could be something unrelated to ...


1

According to MNT, A pimple is a small pustule or papule. Pimples are small skin lesions or inflammations of the skin - they develop when sebaceous glands (oil glands) become clogged and infected, leading to swollen, red lesions filled with pus. Pimples are also known as spots or zits The development of pimples is primarily connected to oil production, dead ...


1

Pimples on the back can be either acne or staphylococcal folliculitis, that is a bacterial infection of the hair follicles, which can look very similar to acne - some pictures here. Staph folliculitis would heal on its own in few weeks or quicker with an antibiotic ointment, while acne are usually more persistent. Pressure upon the back skin might trigger ...


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