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6

This advice for drinking vinegar for acid reflux/GERD is not something I've been able to find any credible backing for. The OP's source for the claim being draxe.com suggests they are talking about this page which, as the OP has correctly determined, is full of contradictory and confusing advice. Along what appears to be a pretty poor grasp of how ...


4

The diet consists of 24 oranges per day plus water. Nothing else. So let's see how much nutrition you're actually getting per day. Percentages are based on US Recommended Daily Intake for an adult. Calories: 1128 kcal (56%) Sugar: 224 grams Fiber: 58 grams (232%) Fat: 2.9 grams (4%) Protein: 22 grams (44%) Vitamins Vitamin A: 24% Thiamine: 192% Riboflavin ...


4

Not sure if I answered this right: leaflady.org The system begins in the mouth, where the pH of saliva is 5.7 – 7.0. In the esophagus the pH is 7.0. The stomach pH is 1.5 – 3.0. In the Duodenum (upper part of the small intestine) pH is 4.0 – 5.0, and in the lower part of the small intestine (jejunum and ileum), pH 6.5 – 7.5 The reason for it: ...


3

Head sweating and flushing after eating or just smelling or thinking about a certain food is called gustatory sweating. MedicineNet: Gustatory sweating: Sweating on the forehead, face, scalp, and neck occurring soon after ingesting food. Some gustatory sweating is normal after eating hot, spicy foods. Otherwise, gustatory sweating is most commonly ...


2

Magnesium citrate is not citric acid. In fact, it's not even acidic. And trimagnesium citrate is even less acidic. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnesium_citrate It's on the alkaline side of neutral, and in fact it's used in medicine to alkalinize patients who are acidotic. Oh, and it's also a pretty strong laxative. So your teeth will be fine. And even if ...


2

As you can see lemon juice is something that can adversely affect your enamel (1). Acid affects your teeth because it leeches calcium from them (2). When this happens your enamel breaks down making your teeth are more vulnerable to bacteria and plaque which then leads to decay. Pure lemon juice is not something you should be downing constantly throughout the ...


2

The recommendation to stop eating lemon and limes to prevent tooth decay is likely due to their acid content. The primary nutritional benefits of citrus fruits are mainly vitamin C (ascorbic acid), though many other useful nutrients are also provided. Luckily, it appears that according to research the bio-availability of "artificial" vitamin C is not ...


1

I found this medical/scientific article that reviews 3 different saliva pH testing kits including a litmus paper test. Litmus paper strips are apparently ubiquitous and many such products available at Walmart, for example.


1

Arguments that suggest that there exists a rather trivial vulnerability in the human body that would be relevant even if you stick to a healthy lifestyle, should a priori be considered to be unlikely. Animals have survived for hundreds of millions of years in the wild without needing to consult expert dietitians to make sure calcium absorption is not ...


1

It's just a rough initial check. Sensitive teeth are indicative of exposed dentin, but not necessarily tooth decay. Teeth have layers to them: The top layer (enamel) is composed almost entirely of hard minerals. It is impermeable, and totally insensitive to physical stimuli. However, the next layer (dentin) is a little softer, and has many thin channels ...


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