Questions tagged [neurology]

The branch of medicine or biology that deals with the anatomy, functions, and organic disorders of nerves and the nervous system.

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71 views

Use of electromyography in diagnosis of Neurogenic Bladder

https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/agricultural-and-biological-sciences/urodynamic-testing What is the use of Electromyography in the diagnosis of Neurogenic Bladder; how is the exam interpreted?
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Are the surgical site infections "in the brain" caused by same bacteria found in "other parts of the body"?

Are the surgical site infections "in the brain" caused by same bacteria found in "other parts of the body"? There's a blood-brain barrier so, most of the bacteria that infect ...
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Does head MRI results showing no lesions rule out MS?

If there are neuropathies in multiple parts of the nervous system and results of a head MRI scan show no lesions in the brain, does this rule out MS? Does it depend on when the symptoms first started (...
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Why actual happy experiences don't have some side effects like stimulant drugs? [migrated]

Science says that the mental side effects of stimulant drugs, like depression, are caused due to the overload of dopaminergic activity in the brain, but when people experience actual great things the ...
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138 views

Would a SARS-CoV-2 infection disrupt the blood-brain barrier, leaving the brain more vulnerable to drugs taken simultaneously with the infection?

According to some studies[1], there is some evidence that the virus could cross the BBB. Is that is the case, does that mean that it would weaken the barrier allowing potentially neurotoxic drugs to ...
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1answer
44 views

Why don't people replace morphine with Beta-Endorphines?

I was reading about the morphine molecule. It binds to our opioid receptors. These opioid receptors have endogenous binding partners also, like β-Endorphin. There have been reports that these ...
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Why do spinal shock syndrome and upper motor neuron lesion have different features?

While discussing the differences between UMN and LMN lesions, one of the most characteristic feature discussed is spastic and flaccid paralysis respectively. Since spinal shock syndrome requires ...
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What are ASDH and AS in the context of "cause of death"?

I'm not sure this is technically the correct place to ask this question, but I know I need medical expertise so hear I am. I have been researching my family genealogy recently and, of special interest ...
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54 views

The effect of dietary protein on neurodegeneration

I have recently come across the following two studies: The first paper was performed on an Alzheimer's disease mouse model, and found that protein restriction cycles reduce IGF-1 and phosphorylated ...
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33 views

Detrimental effects of very-wide or multiple monitors?

Over the past several decades, computer monitors have typically gotten larger, and more specifically wider. Also, it has become (somewhat) more common for people to use an multiple monitors next to ...
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Meaning of "early neurotoxicity" in description of methotrexate treatment effects - at an early age? or an early-stage neurotoxicity?

From a guideline: Due to the inhibitory effect of methotrexate on DHPR and the interaction with dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), this treatment may lead to HPA and early neurotoxicity, possibly ...
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what is the visual feedback in parkinson's disease?

the patient cannot walk normally, but can only walk if there are black and white squares on the floor. How can we explain this visual feedback physiologically? basically what is visual feedback? What ...
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What is the meaning of "subcortical retraction" in a description of MRI of a Kearns-Sayre syndrome patient?

I came across the term subcortical retraction and cannot understand its meaning. Does it mean "the withering of the subcortical areas" (shrinking of subcortical white matter)? From Follow-up ...
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Meningeal irritation in subarachnoid hemorrhage

Meningeal irritation, as indicated by features such as neck stiffness, is a common finding during subarachnoid hemorrhage. However, its pathophysiology is rather unclear to me. In particular, I do not ...
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A neurologist or a psychiatrist or a psychologist, who is better suited to diagnose neurodevelopmental disorders?

There are a lot of neurodevelopmental conditions which are hidden-type and resembles mental conditions. These includes sensory processing disorders, prosopagnosia, developmental coordination disorder (...
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Light adaption of pupil. When is a size adaption normal? [closed]

If an eye gets lighted with a flashlight or other light sources the pupils will decrease their width. This pupillary response is a typical indicator in diagnostics. Is there any specific value which ...
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1answer
524 views

Myasthenia Gravis and preserved deep tendon reflexes, why?

I saw a patient on rounds the other day w/ MG (Myasthenia Gravis) and it was mentioned that DTR (deep tendon reflexes) are preserved. I've been going over it in my head and I am confused why they ...
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Why is multiple sclerosis associated with trigeminal neuralgia?

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is classically described as: an immune-mediated inflammatory disease that attacks myelinated axons in the central nervous system (Luzzio, n.d.). Since MS only involves the ...
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52 views

Would neurons regenerate even in adults? [closed]

I want to know whether or not the nerves regenerate in human adults. My Question Please give me evidences for this issue. What experiments and logic do they use to prove that the nerves are/are not ...
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The Roles of SSRIs and Neurotransmitters in Migraines

How do SSRIs alleviate migraine pain? Can anyone shed any light into the mechanism please? More broadly, I am interested in the roles of neurotransmitters in the cause and potential prevention of ...
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Can dermatomal problems possibly indicate other medical conditions?

I have been reading up about dermatomes and it got me wondering if dermatomal issues can indicate potential problems further into the body than the dermis? For a couple of examples, can say one of T1 ...
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1answer
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Why does Delayed Post-hypoxic Leukoencephalopathy (DPHL) have a biphasic clinical course?

Delayed Post-hypoxic Leukoencephalopathy (DPHL or Grinker myelinopathy) is a rare condition where patients recovering from an anoxic/hypoxic brain injury develops new neurological symptoms 2-4 weeks ...
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Is the MSC-based regenerative medicine promising for Ischemic stroke stroke patients? ; two points difference in the 47-point test

Many papers says, regenerative medicine using MSCs are promising for Ischemic stroke stroke patients. But in my layman's sense, various data don't seem promising. So, I want to hear the opinions of ...
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Does a unilateral total obstruction of the carotid artery cause brain damage?

The brain receives oxygenated blood from both the internal carotid arteries and the vertebral arteries, which are connected through the Willis circle (Circulus arteriosus cerebri). Obstruction of ...
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Does hydroxychloroquine make tardive dyskinesia worse?

I found this article which suggests to me that chloroquine (hydroxychloroquine?) can make tardive dyskinesia worse. Is my reading of it accurate?
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Can neuromuscular electrical stimulation be used as a low-cost alternative to mechanical breathing

It is speculated that because of COVID-19 pandemic there may be shortage of intensive care equipment (mechanical breathers) causing deaths. Though IDK what is so costly in these mechanical breathers ...
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Tilt table test and beta blockers

Is tilt table test indicative with beta blockers for dysautonomia diagnosis? Or is it require drug withdrawal?
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What, if any, are reasonable further tests for evaluation of cryptogenic stroke?

What is considered a "complete" workup of cryptogenic stroke? If someone presents with symptoms consistent with stroke and receives: PE EKG and external monitoring, MRI with contrast/MRA of head and ...
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1answer
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Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis treatments [closed]

Could Batten’s disease be cured by supplementing a drug which promotes lipolysis, since it is caused by an accumulation of lipids in brain?
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How does high-intensity aerobic exercise affect the brain?

I have been reading articles claiming that serotonin, endorphins and BDNF are produced during exercise, but they never mention the intensity or duration of exercise for this to happen. To not make ...
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How does low-intensity aerobic exercise affect the brain?

I have been reading articles claiming that serotonin, endorphins and BDNF are produced during exercise, but they never mention the intensity or duration of exercise for this to happen. To not make ...
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40 views

Why does the brain shrink and increase energy usage after dehydration?

Along with mood and energy deficits a dehydrated brain has to use a lot more energy to accomplish the same tasks, shows a study from King's College London. Quote from Dehydration affects brain ...
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Are transorbital lobotomies still considered ethical these days?

Psychosurgery has a controversial history and despite modifications still raises serious questions about benefit, risks, and the adequacy with which consent is obtained. Its continued use is defended ...
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Peripheral excitability effects of Mirtazapin

Is there any reason/mechanism according to which only two dosages (on two consecutive days) of Mirtazapin 30mg might lead a patient to feel an increase in their peripheral neurological sensitivity, ...
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What’s the role of hypothalamus in headache pathophysiology? [closed]

The hypothalamus forms part of the central autonomic network, regulating body homeostasis and controlling pain. What is its role in headaches?
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1answer
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Tips on identifying CVA patients

In my work, not once i encounter old people with deterioration and i am having hard time deciding if does symptoms may be related to CVA or not and if a neurologist should be called. I will explain ...
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456 views

What things can trigger scintillating scotomas? Are they sometimes classified benign and not a reflection of a condition requiring further treatment?

This is a different question than Are scintillating scotomas really caused by cortical spreading depression? If so, how is this known to be true? asked almost one year ago in Psychology and Neurology ...
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1answer
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Has tardive dyskinesia ever "gotten better?" [closed]

I have tardive dyskinesia and my doctor said when he diagnosed me that it "might" not go away. I've heard that it's "potentially permanent." Has there ever been a recorded case where the condition has ...
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Foods/drugs/vitamins to avoid, or not avoid, for tardive dyskinesia

I'm half expecting this to be closed as off-topic as seeking personal medical advice, but I'm going to try not to phrase it that way and see how it flies. For full disclosure, I was recently diagnosed ...
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Why do some neurons live longer than others?

It seems that the scientific community agrees that the development of new neurons stops between adolescence and early adulthood. ("Does the Adult Brain Really Grow New Neurons?" https://www....
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Can the human brain be taught to recognize new body parts, and how?

A newly emerging category of medical study is the potential to replace a missing piece, in part or in its entirety. While currently in its infancy, the potential for this in human health is astounding....
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538 views

What is the name for the symptom of mishearing words?

There’s a really interesting symptom I remember hearing about, wherein the patient will fail to understand certain sounds correctly, in a repeatable fashion. For example, the patient could be ...
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60 views

Biochemistry of (tap water) iontophoresis?

I'm curious to know what science has to say about the biochemical processes of tap water iontophoresis. I was trying to find some insights from the mechanism of action to answer things like: Why does ...
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Reference request: Parkinson's disease book

I am about start a project on computational modelling of basal ganglia in the context of Parkinson's disease. My background is mostly on computational side (and some neuroscience too) and I know ...
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1answer
89 views

how to stop frequent nocturnal emission [closed]

My age is 28 . I am male and i am un married I do not watch any content that may arouse feelings but still i face the problem of nocturnal emission (without any dream) approximately twice a week ...
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Why can't surgeons operate on nerves?

Why can't surgeons operate on nerves? We see when operating, surgeons always try to protect the major nerves. Doctors handle bones, muscles, tissues but not nerves. Why? Can they see the nerves?
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229 views

What are normal values for EMG/nerve conduction studies?

Where can I find a detailed table of normal values for NCS (nerve conduction studies) for the various arm nerves - ulnar, median, radial; including both motor and sensory component of each nerve; ...
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2answers
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Can aphasia like symptoms be caused by something other than physical trauma to the brain?

From what I've read, Aphasia is always caused by trauma, either a head injury, stroke, etc. Are there linguistic disorders related to the brain selecting the wrong word etc. that are physiological or ...
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Is there any data about the significance of a blood serotonine level test and links to depression or other psychiatric diseases, or simply mood?

What does low or high blood serotonine levels tell us. Is there any data on the link between certain conditions and serum serotonine concentration?
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Why aren't children affected by pins and needles as much as adults?

If I sit down cross-legged on the floor for any more than about ten minutes I start to get pins and needles, and this seems to be common among other adults I have spoken to. My 3 year old daughter on ...