Questions tagged [cancer]

The disease caused by an uncontrolled division of abnormal cells in a part of the body or when describing a malignant growth or tumor resulting from the division of abnormal cells.

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In Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for cancer treatement how Boron compounds gets selectively concentrated to the tumor cell?

In Boron Neutron Capture Therapy how Boron compounds gets selectively concentrated to the tumor cell?
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Cancer treatement: How to select among Surgery, Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy? [closed]

Suppose in a hospital all the thee modalities of cancer treatment is available, how to select among Surgery, Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy?
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Meaning of “I” in a table in a study poster

From a poster to a study: I don't understand the meaning of "I" used in several fields of this table. What could it mean? I've read the abstract of the study but still cannot get it. The ...
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Meaning of “(ref)” in a table describing the characteristics of patients taking part in a cancer study

From a poster describing a study in cancer patients. This is from a table in the poster, which describes the characteristics of the patients (Age groups, Sex ect.) You can see what percentage of the ...
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Meaning of “the benchmark for median survival”

From the Background section of a clinical trial poster: Good performance, unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients should receive standard-of-care treatment, i.e. Concurrent ...
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Who are “good performance patients”?

I'm translating a study poster and came across the following excerpt: Good performance, unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients should receive standard-of-care treatment, i....
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Why is the Virchow node involved in Gastric Adeonocarcinoma?

The lymph node drainage of the stomach is via the pyloric and related lymph nodes. Either way, the supraclavicular node (Virchow's node) is not the first lymph node that drains the Stomach. According ...
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Is biopsy still required for cancer diagnosis given that advanced medical imaging is now available?

For cancer diagnosis, there is biopsy, an invasive technique. However, PET CT, SPECT CT, MRI are non-invasive. Do oncologists still require the use of biopsy to ascertain type of cancer, i.e., to ...
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About Fuzzy Logic Based Expert System impact factor in typical cancer detection

I have this part of paper (its PDF file) : Fuzzy Logic Based Expert System for Detecting Colorectal Cancer So i like to know the medical doctors view point about the emboldened (bolded) sentences ...
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Why does metastatic bone cancer present as back pain that is “worse at night”?

One "classic" presentation of metastatic bone cancer is back pain that "tends to be worse at night and may get better with movement" - American Cancer Society. Googling "back pain worse at night from ...
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Diameters of vessels metastases spread through

As I know, one of the way tumor may metastasis is, forced by hypoxia, creating new vessels near it, connecting them to the main circulatory system and then spread cells through the blood. If ...
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Do carrots cure cancer?

**Do carrots cure cancer? ** There’s a lot of unsubstantiated information online about carrots and cancer. There are even a few books. What does science actually say about how carrots affect cancer ...
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Where can I find the total number of people living with or beyond cancer for the UK and globally, as up to date as possible (<2020)?

I'm trying to work out the total prevalence of cancer (all types) in the UK and globally, defined as someone who is alive and has had a cancer diagnosis at some point in their lives. I'm really ...
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Why aren't purine analogs effective in non-hematological malignancies?

FDA has approved many purine analogs e.g. thioguanine, cladribine, pentostatin, mercaptopurine for various forms of leukemia and/or lymphoma, but none for non-hematological malignancies. What makes ...
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How many people are affected by hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) worldwide today?

Does anybody know how I can learn how many people are affected by hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) worldwide today? I need this information for a research study; I tried to search on Google but I only ...
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Why haven’t other research groups invested into antineoplastons when it comes to cancer treatment?

I recently stumbled upon antineoplastons which is a family of drugs based on chemical natural products prevalent in human blood and urine. I have only been able to find one person administering ...
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What is the relationship between cancer and sugar? [closed]

I was watching "The Magic Pill" documentary series on Netflix. And, a woman indicated that she completely cured a fairly aggressive breast cancer by eliminating just about all sugars and most ...
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Do Tamoxifen and other similar SERMs reduce chest fat chronically or permanently?

I am sorry if it mistaken (please comment or suggest an edit to fix) but by chronically I mean as long as the molecule is administered and effective and by permanently I mean after the molecule was ...
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What is the difference between the TNM and cancer staging

I know there are different staging methods. In breast cancer the TNM and basic staging of breast cancer are integrated. In colon cancer we have the TNM staging and the another method ranging from 0 to ...
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What is the relapse rate of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults by years after complete remission?

I understand the rates drop substantially some years after complete remission but clear figures would be very helpful.
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Is tacrolimus carcinogenic and if so, what causes it to be?

The FDA issued a health warning 1 regarding the possible cancer risks of tacrolimus ointment, however, British dermatologists2 don't consider this a significant concern and they are increasingly ...
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What kind of cell kill probabilities per division you get with chemotherapy?

As I understand it, many chemotherapeutic drugs target cell division, with the theory that a constant kill probability per cell division kills fast-replicating cancer cells faster than slow-...
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Is there a cancer treatment method that uses a poison and an antidote?

I am wondering if the following method (or similar variations) for treating cancer exists and if so if it works. The metod is to deliver an ”antidote” to all cells (or all cells of a specific type) ...
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What is the current standpoint on cooking with olive oil?

Usually I make dishes by adding a tablespoon of olive oil to the meat or vegetables and just have them for some time on a teflon pan. I know that frying is done on high temperatures and results in ...
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Cancer treatment through regulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells

There are many ongoing clinical trials that leverage the power of the immune system to recognize tumor cells such as CD47 and PDL1/PD1, and even engineered T cells! I ran across an immune cell type ...
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Has someone with elevated cytokine levels more probability of developing Hodgkin lymphoma?

Brian F. Skinnider and Tak W. Mak, 2002: The clinical and pathologic features of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) reflect an abnormal immune response that is thought to be due to the ...
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If screening for a disease is not recommended, should someone with positive findings take further action?

Consider the following hypothetical case: Mary is a woman who has no ovarian cancer symptoms and is not known to have a high-risk cancer syndrome. She nevertheless gets a transvaginal ultrasound and ...
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Why is there is no screening for Ovarian Cancer?

From what I have read it is not considered effective to screen for ovarian cancer in non-symptomatic women. Would it not be worth doing an ultra-sound scan, then if there are growths found, do a ROMA ...
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Does intermittent fasting induce autophagic cell death?

https://www.cancertherapyadvisor.com/home/tools/fact-sheets/intermittent-fasting-and-cancer/ In vitro and in vivo animal studies suggest that PF inactivates pro-proliferative pathways, while ...
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How safe is low frequency radiation in I.T. edge cases? (5G, etc)

Closely Related: 5G Radiation Dangerous? Being inundated with all kinds of 5G health statements, (for & against), I noticed a weird trend - the absence of cumulative radiation studies. Question: ...
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Barrett's esophagus (BO) and proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs)

I have come across an interview with a European gastroenterologist (apparently from 2006) where he argues that in cases where a reflux disease does not cause typical symptoms even the presence of a ...
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basil cancer on outer ear-tight glasses maybe the cause? [closed]

Can tight glasses cut the circulation to the outer ear? Thus making the outer ear fresh oxygen blood starved and it then be more susceptible to basil cancer? i have currently been diagnosed with basil ...
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Understanding cancer

I am a lay person who wants a broad technical understanding of cancer including a survey of types, their etiologies, epidemiology, treatment modalities, prognoses, and current state of the art ...
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Help me understand these descriptions of coal tar

I have read the Wikipedia article on coal tar. I started reading the article thinking that the principal use of it was in construction, such as in roofs and sealed roads. I found out that it was first ...
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How much hazardous is cell site to our health?

A telephone company is installing a cell tower (cellular base station-antenna) 40 meters from my house (right in front of my house). The first thing I am concerning about is its effect to our health. ...
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Can Telomers be tampered with using Nano technology? [closed]

Can Telomers be tampered with using Nano particles or nano robots that can be artificially used to CAUSE cancer? I happen to run into this website Talking about nano technology based cancer research. ...
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Is an annual stomach x-ray (barium meal) an acceptable radiation risk for a resident of Japan?

I live in Japan. Here, it is common for an annual health checkup to include a barium meal stomach x-ray, especially for people over 35, but sometimes younger. A gastroenterologist told me that this ...
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What is the difference of a physician specializing in cytology and a physician specializing in medical genetics?

Is cell biology much broader than just genetics or am I conjecturing nonsense? Who is the specialist in the molecular biology of cancer? I am a cancer patient since 16, a medical student aiming for ...
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Cancer Drugs that Interfere with Glucose Uptake

I have been reading about certain compounds that inhibit tumor development by means of interfering with GLUT1 transporters. (Eg: https://www.caymanchem.com/pdfs/19900.pdf) I was wondering if there ...
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Where might “Counter side Ax” be located? (Description of tumor location)

From a clinical trial article: The table describes the locations in which breast cancer tumors recurred in patients. I think that Ax means "axillary" or "axilla", but I don't understand the whole ...
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Meaning of “Chest wall, Sp, Ps” in a description of tumor recurrence locations

From a clinical trial report: I think that Ps stands for parasternal (nodes) but what could Sp mean? I haven't found a mention of "Sp" in the literature by googling for about 20 minutes. P.S. ...
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How is “histologically invasive diameter” assessed in live patients?

Quote: A total of 34 patients were registered between July 2009 and June 2012. The mean age was 53.5 years. The median follow-up time was 23.7 months (2-24 months). The age at the time of ...
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Meaning of “platinum sensitivity and primary PFI being repowered as prognostic factors”

Quote from a clinical trial report: Recurrence eventually affects 70–80% of patients with advanced epithelial ovar-ian cancer [2, 22], with platinum sensitivity and primary PFI being repowered as ...
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What is the purpose of the “observation cohort” in a clinical trial?

Quote from a clinical trial report (JGOG3022 trial): Patients who were scheduled to receive bevacizumab concomitantly with platinum-based combination chemotherapy after PDS or IDS were included in ...
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594 views

The Ethics of extra treatment

This is something that I have been considering for quite a while based on a fictional story I had read. An unconscious individual must undergo emergency surgery in order to stabilise them and prevent ...
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Isn't “epithelial carcinoma” a tautological term? Are there non-epithelial carcinomas?

From "Bevacizumab combined with platinum–taxane chemotherapy as first-line treatment for advanced ovarian cancer: a prospective observational study of safety and efficacy in Japanese patients (...
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What study materials can a layperson use to gain a deeper understanding of lung cancer?

I am an outsider to the medical sciences, yet now in desperate need of knowledge to help a family member with lung cancer navigate the difficult medical system in our country. I would like to develop ...
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Can tumor size (T) and presence of cancer in the lymph nodes (N) in patients with lung cancer be identified on the first visit?

I am a scientific researcher working on lung cancer. I am trying to develop a machine learning method able to process just few early detection features and then predict if a patient with lung cancer ...
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What is the mechanism behind the association between azathioprine use and a higher risk of developing lymphoma?

We know that use of azathioprine and other thiopurines is associated with a small but statistically significant increase in the risk of developing lymphoma, as shown in [1] and several other easily ...
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How is hereditary cancer risk estimated?

Consider the following example: Suppose X is a person whose mother Y died of cancer (breast) after undergoing treatment for 13 years. The doctors had said that Y could have lived 15 years but ...